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  5. "C'est sa montre."

"C'est sa montre."

Translation:That is her watch.

February 12, 2013

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/raymacyaya

Couldn't another possible translation be "That is his watch" as the "sa" is simply agreeing with the gender of "montre" and is not indicative of the owner's gender?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arjofocolovi

Yes. Both "his watch" and "her watch" should be accepted in this exercise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/timshelburne

I assume this means montre can also be a noun that means "watch", in the sense of "vigile"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arjofocolovi

"montre" as a noun is a watch, the object used to keep track of the time.

This is what a French will mean when he'll use the word as a noun. "montre" can also be a conjugation form of the verb "montrer" ("to show").

There are a few other translations, but they're not used at all in common French (in fact when you asked this question I made a research out of curiosity, and I didn't even know that "montre" could be used other ways as a noun, even though I'm French).

Here is what I found if you're still interested :

http://www.wordreference.com/fren/montre

In the other hand, "watch" has many different translations in French, both as a noun and a verb.

http://www.wordreference.com/enfr/watch


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frank-O-Phile

Ha! Your comment is especially interesting, since Duolingo first introduces "montre" as a verb. Seems an odd choice on their part. Why not introduce it's more common and familiar meaning first?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arjofocolovi

I only meant that "montre" for the meaning "watch" was the most common as a noun, I wasn't comparing it to the verb "montrer". The verb "montrer" is quite common, and it's not surprising that it's being introduced very soon in the lesson.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 2077

"La montre" refers to a (wrist)watch. When referring to keeping a lookout, "watch" means "une surveillance". A person on watch may be called "une sentinelle".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ag3n7_z3r0

I am hearing [se se] and not [se sa] on the normal speed (slow speed is fine). Anyone else?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4u1e

Normal speeds sounds like sa c'est to me. As you say, slow is fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garykwong

C'est=that is; not "this is"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 2077

It could be either.

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