https://www.duolingo.com/EbeneezerAl

Personal "a" introduction.

So, I know this has been talked about a little in lesson and sentence discussions, but I have a few points on the matter I didn't see mentioned, and I thought it worth a discussion of its own. I just recently started prepositions in Spanish, which in my opinion introduces it's words in odd ways. I learned "por" with "por favor," the translation of which does not use the word "for." The same is true of "de" in "de nada," also my introduction to the word. It's a little confusing when the lesson is supposed to be teaching me that "de" means "of" when "de nada" means "you're welcome." However, these pale in comparison to the word "a" being first introduced to me as the personal "a". It lit up orange to tell me I learned a new word. I hovered, it told me what "a" meant. I translated the sentence, which seemed weird to me, but there are a few odd sentences to be translated on this site, so I didn't think too much of it. Only when I click submit, I get the question wrong because the new word was introduced to me in a specific use in which is doesn't actually translate. And the only reason I knew why I got it wrong was because there was sentence discussion. Duolingo itself did not explain the usage. I translated three sentences with the word "a" before I got to one that actually used it as a word to be translated. Which seems odd in a lesson that's supposed to be teaching me what the word "a" means. It just seems to me that the site should teach me what the word means before giving me context sensitive alternative uses for it. Or at least explain that use when it comes up so I understand what's going on. On an unrelated note, I apologize for this giant unbroken paragraph. I don't know if it's a site issue or something with my computer, but I can't seem to space down

4 years ago

2 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Eriklover555

Just as a note: "de nada" literally means "it's nothing." So de in this case does not mean "you're" or "welcome."

Also, paragraph breaks take two presses of the "return" or "enter" button.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KevinBranh

This will help a little http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/persa.htm There is no english translation for the "a" but most translators try to say it means "to" technically that is not correct it does happen to work sometimes.

I would look up "volver a" + infinitive and "ir a + infinitive" and gustar seems to have an optional stressor like "A mi me gusta.." A ti te gusta..." "A ella le gusta..."

4 years ago
Learn a language in just 5 minutes a day. For free.

Learn a language in just 5 minutes a day. For free.