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  5. "Ви будете їхати у Київ?"

"Ви будете їхати у Київ?"

Translation:Will you go to Kyiv?

November 14, 2016

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

from Old East Slavic form Kyjev' (Cyrillic: Къıєвъ), so "Kiev/Kiyev" existed long before "Ukraine," "Belarus," "Russia," or the Russian language! Therefore Kiev as a modern English name of the city should be just fine. English speakers can't even pronounce Kyiv because there is no Ukrainian И sound in English. It should be spelled "Kiyiv" for it to approximate the Ukrainian name for the city in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lena_gardariki

"Ви будете їхати у Київ? " = "Will you be going to Kyiv?" "Ви поїдете у Київ?" = "Will you go to Kyiv?" Please correct me if I am wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

That's correct, but the specific conjugation "will you be going" is not obligatory. "Will you go" also works.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lena_gardariki

Duo asks it the other way round, that's the problem imho. People are learning the phrase "Ви будете їхати у Київ?" as a way to say "Will you go to Kyiv?", which is not quite correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

It's absolutely correct. Ukrainian doesn't really differentiate between "will you go" or "will you be going" as far as a conjugation of the verb "to go," because Ukrainian uses perfective and imperfective verbs. English doesn't have perfective and imperfective aspect verbs, but Ukrainian does. Їхати is an imperfective verb. Поїхати is a perfective verb. So, depending on the verb, the meaning is slightly different. In English, aspect is determined by context. So without context, both translations work for "will you go" and "will you be going."

Try not to think of these two conjugations as "set in stone" one-to-one translations of будете їхати and поїдете. Translating between English and Ukrainian is more flexible


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lena_gardariki

Thanks but I am not comparing їхати and поїхати, it is just about the way of asking the question "Will you go to Kyiv?" in Ukrainian. The version "Ви будете їхати у Київ?" is grammatically correct but it needs a special context I think (e.g. якщо будете їхати в Київ, дорогою зверніть увагу на це мальовниче місце). Without a context the phrase "Ви поїдете/їдете в Київ?" seems to be a more usual way to ask somebody if he goes to Kyiv... but this course does not include it far as I can see.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zonia435615

Thanks fellas. But I will choose to use 'Kyiv' in my spelling. I understand what you're trying to say. (I don't care for the 'literal gobble-de-❤❤❤❤'), but I know right from wrong. I still think 'Kiev' is the Russian spelling that the English-speaking world has 'accepted'. I choose to keep the Ukrainian spelling within the Ukrainian language - whatever language one speaks in. For ancestral respect. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/walkinwolk

As this is being translated to English, please accept "Kiev" for "Kyiv". Any English language article or book would spell Kiev this way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucyLovecraft

But as of about 2017 (I think?), "Kyiv" is the official spelling as far as the U.S. government and the publishing industry are concerned. So while popular usage may lag a bit, official written material will show "Kyiv". It's a "Peking" vs. "Beijing" scenario.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

Every language has its own name for cities. For example, Beijing in Russian is Пекин (Pekin). If we change Kiev to Kyiv in English, we should also change Łódź, Poland, to "Wooj" so we can pronounce it correctly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucyLovecraft

I see your point, but I believe my analogy stands. "Peking" came to the European languages by way of a French transliteration of a Nanjing dialect pronunciation of Mandarin dialect "Běijīng". English (at least) has moved to a transliteration of the name that more accurately reflects the pronunciation of the actual people who live there, due in part to the PRC's deliberate push for pinyin romanisation. Doesn't mean it's an 100% accurate reflection of how locals say it, but it's closer. Seems like the government in Kyiv has made a similar argument. All that aside, since the US Board on Geographic Names, the White House, and the UK Foreign Office all use "Kyiv", it's a sensible spelling to enforce when translating between English and Ukrainian. Official Anglophone published material follows those sources. As went the Peking duck, one day so too shall go the chicken Kiev. That's just how English usage tends to develop.

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