"Mañanaesmiércoles."

Translation:Tomorrow is Wednesday.

5 years ago

65 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DanishFlipper

Why is "Tomorrow it is Wednesday" incorrect?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

because you put the subject twice. It is like saying: John he plays.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clawedinvader

It may not be 100% perfect English (I'm not sure) but it would be a common phrase to hear in English, "Tomorrow, it is Wednesday", or possibly more commonly as "It is Wednesday tomorrow".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

using the comma or changing the word order in this way separates the function of the words. Tomorrow is then a time adverb, and therefore the sentence requires the mandatory subject, being it the default one.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clawedinvader

I agree, you are right, of course. I was just pointing out that it is (sort of) ok to say "Tomorrow it is Wednesday" - and DL usually lets you off for only missing punctuation (even when it is important).

For people who think that punctuation is unnecessary: A comma can save someone's life, there is a BIG difference between "Let's eat grandma" and "Let's eat, grandma".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

To elaborate on what Santi_Minstrel said, I'll add that I think he was referring to the fact that you added a pronoun subject (that is, "it") after the noun subject, which is the English noun "tomorrow."

Although the Spanish null subject pronoun "it" is understood to be part of the syntax and grammar of this Spanish sentence, it is unnecessary and incorrect syntax to use both a noun subject and a pronoun subject in a translation into English.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuliusPlatypus

It was accepted for me on 09/11/18

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gillespieza

What is the etymology of the days of the week? Lunes = Monday, sure that's obviously commonly derived, but the rest?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

The word semana comes from Latin septimana [7 days]. The names of the seven days come from 7 objects which the Ancient Mesopotamian saw move through the sky. Romans took this to name their days:

  • Luna [Moon] (Lunes, from Lunae dies),
  • Marte [Mars] (Martes, from Martis dies),
  • Mercurio [Mercury] (Miércoles, from Mercurii dies),
  • Júpiter [Jupiter] (Jueves, from Iovis dies),
  • Venus [Venus] (Viernes, from Veneris dies),
  • Saturno [Saturn] (Sábado, from Saturni dies first, then changed due to hebrew influence),
  • Sol [Sun] (Domingo, from Solis dies first, then changed due to Christian influence)

Note that Dominus is Lord in latin, Domingo really comes from dominica (Lord's day, day of rest for Christians, based on Genesis where it appears the seventh), and Sábado comes from Sabat (day of rest for Jews, God rested that day and the Christian week still had not been set at that moment, therefore the Day of the Sun was the first day of the week and the Sabat, the seventh).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lettylingw

Whew! That'a a whole lot of history there. But thaaaaaanks!!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreeFast

Why aren't days of the week capitalized?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jazzdragon022

I think that is an english language quirk? I don't think they capitalize them in french, either.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shatley707

English is a language where proper nouns are generally capitalized. German capitalizes ALL nouns. I don't know what the noun capitalization rules are for Spanish, if any. Spanish may not be a language that uses capitalization to distinguish between regular and proper nouns

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dataslayer
Dataslayer
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http://www.howto.gov/web-content/multilingual/spanish-guide/capitalization for more specific times that you would use capitalization in Spanish. It seems a lot of rules are different from language to language. >.>

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

Besides beginning sentences, only proper names (of people, places, etc) are capitalized, in addition to all those pronouns, names, ... related with God.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mariecwake

Correct not capitalised because it is a common noun not a name of somebody or name of town.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Julien867197

Nope they dont in french. Same with the months too.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kas334864
Kas334864
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Week days aren't strictly proper names. They come back every week :)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueaksLoves

Good purgunta.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mariecwake

Because they are nouns.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AliciaZela6

Tomorrow is Wednesday is correct........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................I guess

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/damnzam

Grammatically interchangeable?

(Tomorrow is Wednesday vs Wednesday is tomorrow)

or is that an English thing.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Well, it means the same, of course, but there are also two possible ways to say it in Spanish: "Mañana es miércoles" and "Miércoles es mañana." So only "Tomorrow is Wednesday" should be counted as a proper translation.

They might also have a slight semantic difference, but that mostly depends on what you emphasise. "Tomorrow is Wednesday" is an answer to "What day is it tomorrow?" while "Wednesday is tomorrow" is a reply to "When is it Wednesday?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Balogun4

Que

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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¿Puedo ayudar?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeganRobbi3

but!! today is wednesday!!!!!!!!???!?!?!? :) ;)

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrandenRic2

Cómo se dice HUMP DAAAY?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chris270337

Trying to figure out when to put the "el" before a day. Here it isnt needed, but if we were saying "the game is wednesday" it would, right? Why is that?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"El [weekday]" most often translates to "on [weekday]" in English. So since you can say "The game is on Wednesday", the Spanish sentence should be "El partido es el miércoles". But you can't say "Tomorrow is on Wednesday", so it's only "Mañana es miércoles."

Or differently expressed, both mañana and miércoles are days, so you can equate them without an article. On the other hand, "el partido" is not a day, but an event. You can only place it within a day, so you need the article.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CorneliusA5

It ask me to write what i hear and give me error because i didnt translated It is not fun anymore It is start to agravate me

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aanonymous4

YOU DONT KNOW HALF OF IT ON HOW MUCH I ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤ HATE WASTING MY TIME ON THIS ❤❤❤❤ WHILE I COULD INSTEAD OF RELAX FROM ❤❤❤❤❤❤ SCHOOL.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/muatik
muatik
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why not 'la mañana es miércoles.'?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

Mañana (tomorrow) cannot take an article (think of "the tomorrow"). La mañana is the morning.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skirkk
skirkk
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Would "Mañana es el miércoles" be accepted? Would it have the same meaning, Spanish speakers?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

It would sound a bit unnatural. It sounds as if 'el miercoles' was the subject. In fact, you can perfectly say "El miércoles es mañana" as in:

  • Necesitamos pensarlo más. Pospondremos la reunión hasta el próximo miércoles.
  • ¡El miércoles es mañana!

[We need to rethink it more. We'll postpone the meeting to next Wednesday] [Wednesday is tomorrow!]

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaurabhMis8

I have a general question about days of the week - do native speakers actually use spanish names of the days while speaking informally or do they just call sunday, monday etc. ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AspiroFremor
AspiroFremor
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Why on Earth would they use English names instead of Spanish? It could be as well the other way around - why don't you say poniedziałek, wtorek, etc. instead of Monday, Tuesday, etc. informally? It is not your language, and English is by no means the informal language of the planet.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdedapoMui

True

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ninja_mangle

(Sobbing) Why am i not getting it right?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesATurn1

yes tomorrow is Wednesday

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rebecca789033

I didn't capitalize the T in tomorrow

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gordon49549

Not accepting a correct answer

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gordon49549

I put in Tomorrow is Wednesday and it is not accepted as correct, why not?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Keenan99101

How come tommorow is wrong and tomorow is right? Brits spell it tommorow?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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No, Brits don't spell it "tommorow". It's always "tomorrow", single m, double r.
"Tomorow" is accepted because Duolingo allows one typo per word (as long as that typo doesn't change the meaning). "Tommorow" contains two typos, so it isn't accepted.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatsyAnn27

For accuracy of grammar, should it not be: "Tomorrow will be Wednesday."? Or even, " . . . shall be . . . "?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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No inaccurate grammar here. The day of tomorrow is already Wednesday at the time of speaking.

The most accurate sentences are, to my interpretation, "Tomorrow is Wednesday", where you take "tomorrow" as a noun and identify it with being Wednesday. And "Tomorrow it will be Wednesday" where you use "tomorrow" as an adverb of time that (technically, but not colloquially) requires you to use a future tense.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

It is not a good translation practice to change the tense unnecessarily. While some idiomatic interpretations demand that vocabulary be changed, this sentence is so simple that making such changes is undesirable. Changing the tense from present tense to future tense is too much of a leap, although depending on context it is common to translate Spanish simple present tense into either English simple present tense or English present progressive tense.

English present progressive tense (for example, "he is eating") has the same form as Spanish continuous tense (está comiendo) but each are used to express a different colloquial meaning. Spanish sometimes uses Spanish present tense to express what English uses English progressive tense for, and the Spanish "ir" + "a" + infinitive form is used where English uses English future tense.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nicole415500

Don t find the accents on my phone

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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You might try to install a Spanish keyboard. Otherwise, with some keyboards it works if you hold the key for the base letter down ('n' and 'e' in this case). Then a menu pops up with options for diacritical marks for that letter ('ñ' and 'é').

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Obscenic

"Tomorrow is Wed." is rejected as incorrect...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Although somebody voted down your comment, Obscenic, I submit that it's a good one because you are pointing out that abbreviations are only accepted in the most informal English writing.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dinkyslinky
dinkyslinky
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Why is "It's Wednesday tomorrow" wrong?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

You should report that yours is a valid interpretation.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MalikatetheGreat

Stay strong my dudes. Wednesday is almost upon us.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nishka322451

This is lame. I wrote Tommorow is Wednesday 30 times and it keeps saying incorrect. Cant finish.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Because the program doesn't recognise your spelling. "Tomorrow" is spelt with one 'm' and two 'r'. Try that. :)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jovana198823

'It is Wednesday tomorrow' is not accepted?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jhonalexan609573

We say: tomorrow is wednesday"

Tomorrow (subject)

Is (verb; to be 'Is')

Wednesday (complement)

So; subj+verb+complement form a correct word.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KindCuteDi

How did they know??

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joshua248342

I spelled Wednesday wrong, so they said its wrong

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KleineNapoleon

The correct translation is: tomorrow IT is wednesday

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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The correct comment is: "ONE correct translation is..."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Yes, but as pointed out elsewhere in the forums, a comma after "tomorrow" is mandatory if you translate with "it" as the sentence's subject.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Is it? It doesn't really feel right. I wouldn't put a comma in a sentence like "Yesterday I walked my dog."

3 months ago
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