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https://www.duolingo.com/Fatty-Lumpkin

Turkish influences?

So I've just started Romanian today on a bit of a whim. I've done a bit of the Turkish course beforehand. Already I've come across two words that are making me think of Turkish o - she ceai - tea The same in Turkish! I wonder what else the Ottoman empire might have left behind?

I must also add that I am finding Romanian fascinating!

1 year ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/XD29
XD29
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She is ea, not o (?) and ceai sounds like the Russian word.

I'm also very happy that Romanian is finally available after such a long wait.

Good luck with the course!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PfifltriggPi
PfifltriggPi
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"Ceai" is the Russian word, just romanised.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vytah
vytah
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Ceai ultimately is of Cantonese or Mandarin origin and got to Europe through the Portuguese, Persians and Russians.

The word tea is of Min origin and it was introduced to Europe by the Dutch.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etymology_of_tea#Etymological_observations

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jzsuzsi
jzsuzsi
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http://www.indifferentlanguages.com/words/tea

For tea, a lof of countries use a variant of "tea", and another lot of countries use a variant of chai. It originally comes from Chinese.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SebastianMolin

Yes - the influence lives in words like "pisică" as we'll...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wyqtor
wyqtor
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I don't know about that - 'pisică' is 'kedi' în Turkish, at least nowadays...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SebastianMolin

It was common during ottoman days. It was a loan word from farsi, but some how it ended up in Romanian as well :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JimLeonard0
JimLeonard0
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there are certainly words in Romanian that come from Turkish. Some examples are ciorbă and geam. You can find a list of them on Wiktionary.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SebastianMolin

The word "ceai" (chai) is common in many languages. This includes Turkish, Arabic, Assyrian, Portuguese, Russian, many more. My best bet is that this has something to do with the trade routes and business made in the ancient days.
When Merchants would buy products from people of a different nation, it was common to call it by the same name it was bought as.
Although a difficult concept to explain, it actually makes sense.
For example,
Brand names are the same in most parts of the globe: Nutella, Lays, Doritos.
Food names: Tacos, Burritos, Sarma(le). :-))

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fallasus101

If you look hard enough you will find many words of Turkic influence even in languages that were never part of the Ottoman Empire. This is partially because the Turks were not the only Turkic people to migrate to Europe, the Bulgars, for example, come to mind. Many of the Turkic loanwords found in those languages actually come from Old Turkic, not Turkish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fatty-Lumpkin

Ooh dear I never meant to set off a debate about tea! Lol but this is very interesting! :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xaghtaersis
xaghtaersis
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It is also tea in Porutugese but with a different spelling. The word probably comes from Arabic.

1 year ago

[deactivated user]

    Chinese actually.

    EditDelete1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/xaghtaersis
    xaghtaersis
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    So from Chinese to Arabic to Russian, Turkish, Romanian and Portuguese?

    1 year ago

    [deactivated user]

      Do you mean the word entered the other languages through Arabic?

      EditDelete1 year ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/xaghtaersis
      xaghtaersis
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      Yes

      1 year ago

      [deactivated user]

        Do you have any sources to back that statement? "chá" doesn't feature in the list of Portuguese words of Arabic origin...

        EditDelete1 year ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/xaghtaersis
        xaghtaersis
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        For some reason I cannot reply to your last comment. I looked it up. There are multiple origens for the word. All got Chinese as a starting though. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etymology_of_tea

        1 year ago

        [deactivated user]

          "Portuguese traders were the first Europeans to import the herb in large amounts. The Portuguese borrowed their word for tea (chá) from Cantonese in the 1550s". Not Arabic then. I'm curious as to why you thought that would be the origin? :)

          EditDelete1 year ago

          https://www.duolingo.com/xaghtaersis
          xaghtaersis
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          I thought it entered through arab traders.

          1 year ago

          [deactivated user]

            Nah this goes back to when we actually did things ourselves

            EditDelete1 year ago

            https://www.duolingo.com/helenrowlett2

            Romanian might have Turkish influences but ceai is not one of them. Chai is the original word for tea in Hindi and is also seen in Japanese, Chinese and sometimes in English.

            1 year ago