"Noi bem un ceai sau o cafea."

Translation:We drink a tea or a coffee.

November 16, 2016

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/LongHenry
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we would not include the indefinite articles in the English sentence.

November 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Multi0Lingual4
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I think "a coffee" is fine, like, "I would like a coffee," but "a tea" is weird. "I would like a tea?" Eh...

November 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LongHenry
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"a coffee" is an informal abbreviation of the standard term; a CUP of coffee. the use of the singular indefinite article is grammatically correct in this phrase as CUP is singular and not plural, unlike the words tea and coffee which are in the plural. the indefinite article a must precede a singular noun. note if we change CUP to CUPS the clause becomes grammatically incorrect as in; "a cups of coffee".

November 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Demonym281
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you're right that it's informal; I would say the same about 'a tea' which my family, for example (from England) would say in certain contexts. So then it's a question of whether informal English sentences should count. Because this is English > Romanian, assuming the speaker knows English already, I think it's fine.

December 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/MicahFerguson

I hear "a tea," all the time, I don't think it's too uncommon to here it said.

November 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/heimaey
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It could be said either way.

November 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JL-XI

I agree, it doesn't sound quite right. It would be "We drink tea or coffee." because tea and coffee are both plurals.

November 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Estel785882
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"Tea" and "coffee" are mass nouns, not plurals. (You can tell they're not plurals because we say "tea is good" and "coffee is good", not "tea are good" and "coffee are good").

Like many mass nouns, they can be turned into countable nouns in some circumstances. "A coffee" can be a cup of coffee (in another context, it could be a particular variety of coffee - "there's a really good coffee from Ethiopia that a friend introduced me to last week").

It's less common to say "a tea" to refer to a cup of tea, but it's also possible. I can imagine going to a cafe and ordering "a large tea".

November 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JL-XI

Ohh that's true, I didn't think of it like that before :) thanks.

November 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Zigeunerin-Gypsy

I'm really confused, I hovered over "un ceai" and the duo dictionary said the translation was "a cup of tea" but when I typed that in, it told me it was incorrect and it really means "a tea" (which I think sounds perfectly fine in English). Is there a separate, more correct way to say "a cup of tea"?

January 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Carlismile

We have tea a lot with people, and "un ceai" is completely acceptable as far as I can tell. I hear it and have said it many times. "Un ceai" doesn't literally translate to "a cup of tea," but just as you can say in Engish "Would you like a tea?" you can say in Romanian "Vrei un ceai?"

January 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/David761437

Hey there, Carlismile. Hope your day is pretty good so far:) I was just wondering whether "vrei" actually means "would you like" or is this a rather informal way to express it, much like "do you want (care for) a (cup of) tea?"? If not, how would you say it in a formal context? Thanks in advance!

March 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MicahFerguson

Hi David! "vrei" would be considered commonplace, so yes, not formal. To make it formal, you can simply use the plural conjugation of the verb for "you want." So "vreti" said even to a single person would be considered formal. You could also use the formal version of you: "Dumneavoastra vreti." This would be the most formal way to address someone (that I know of), as far as I can tell (but I am still learning). I don't hear this amongst peers, but when speaking to the elderly I will hear people speaking more formally. So yes, I think you'd be safe in a formal situation saying "vreti". Hope that is helpful =)

March 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ArnauOlmo
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What is the difference between "un" and "o"?

October 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/lufloidio
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o= a, an; if the noun is female.

un= a, an; if the noun is male.

Greetings from Colombia

February 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MasonAnder785569

give me the anwsres

September 13, 2018
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