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  5. "Te rog, eu nu sunt un copil!"

"Te rog, eu nu sunt un copil!"

Translation:Please, I am not a child!

November 16, 2016

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard_Lobos

At first I thought "rog" could be another romanian word with slavic origin since it doesn't sound very latin but I found out that "Te rogo" in latin means "I ask/request of you". Interesting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaudaMercurium

yup, Spanish "Te ruego..." still has that meaning, as well as meaning "I pray (to) you...." in both a religious and non-religious sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/raztud

Mă rog = I pray, in religious way. Te rog = Please; Vă rog = Please (polite or for plural)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelvincristi

In Portuguese "te rogo" is also used in a religious sense. To ask for god. ;D Neo-latin languages are amazingly linked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eofor22

In Portuguese, "rogar" is a verb that can be used as "to ask/to beg". However, "rogar praga" ("praga" can be translated as "curse") means "to curse (someone)" or "to wish something bad (upon someone)". E.g. "Ele rogou praga em você" ("He cursed you").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gopherofdoom

This seems to be missing an "a" between "not" and "kid"!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elmoreserve

Articles on Duolingo are totally, completely and absolutely random.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jpaugh

What do you mean by that? Some courses have no such problem. I assume its a translation error.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheLetteredLad

Can the collocation "te rog" be literally translated to "I ask you"? I just want to get a grasp of the phrases' individual words to get a better meaning of what exactly is being said.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Getaraketa

yes, it can be literally translated to "i ask you". the verb "a ruga" can be translated as to ask, to implore, to beg, to pray :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheLetteredLad

Mulțumesc, Getaraketa.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phoebe422511

When you get put at the kids table at holiday dinners


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Claude522151

I guess 'rog' is the latin root of 'inter-rog-ate', maybe that makes it easier to remember?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cosmo-pedant

In the legal context, "letters rogatory" is a request by one court to another for help.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/passionfruit12

Duo is getting sassy already.


[deactivated user]

    Hell yeah


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertAna1

    I am not kid is wrong grammatically. I am not a kid is now correct


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RodneyRaRa

    Yes, like someone has already mentions "te rog" does look and sound similar to the Spanish "te ruego" which also have the meaning of "I beg of you". Languages are so cool.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nahuatl1939

    Richard_lobos : you are correct and it is like spanish TE RUEGO


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fliss777394

    The English translation here should be 'I am not a kid'


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nahuatl1939

    in French we have the word ROGATIONS ( always plural) which belongs to the catholic liturgy. They are the 3 days processions preceeding the Ascention ( or is it Ascent) of Christ. The same word exists in Spanish ( rogacion) Italian ( rogazione) THE ORIGIN IS, of course, LATIN, from SANSCRIT " RIJ" which means to ask, to extend towards. To translate the idea of ROG, ROGAR, French uses PRIER ( UNE PRIERE) and Italian uses PREGARE ( una preghiera) French JE TE PRIE, Italian TI PREGO o PREGO.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisDann2

    Not from Sanskrit but Proto-Indo-European!


    [deactivated user]

      My good old fav phrase


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XamLeumas

      I'm a child of God though.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Colin220650

      So it's incorrect if I don't bother to add an exclamation mark?!

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