1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Portuguese
  4. >
  5. "Eu tenho andado por aí."

"Eu tenho andado por aí."

Translation:I have walked around.

February 19, 2014

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jamesalex1

Not "I have walked over there"??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_JesusG_

Anyone know if this is correct? Report?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tvindy
  • 2028

It's correct. "Por aí" means around. I once asked a Brazilian friend where she had been for the past several days. She responded, "por aí," because she didn't want to say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HarryHalle2

Exactly--it's an idiom. That makes it difficult to get the translation right the first time, but now you know. (Digression: One of the things I don't like about Duolingo and other conversational/immersive language curricula is that new words, grammar, usage, idioms, etc. often aren't explained before they are thrown at you.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davu

I would translate this as "I have been walking around". For the possible interpretations of "por aí" see Paulenrique's comment here: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/283219.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_JesusG_

Ok then "por aí" means the same thing as "por allí" in Spanish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KokiMena

I agree with you...so it should translate to "around there"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spyglass398

Not a native speaker but Linguee.com has several translations for "andar por aí": go out, go around, go round, go about. The examples seem to be more like saskia.schroeter's first use, "I have been walking around [aimlessly]", rather than "I have been walking around [the tree]". See, http://www.linguee.com/english-portuguese/search?source=auto&query=andar+por+a%ED.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lanehanson

When is a circumflex (ô) to be used with "por"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davu

"Por" is a preposition and (with the accent) "pôr" is the infinitive of a verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chimpunk

I have been walking around there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wr.Catington

Hé? What is the difference between caminhar and andar then? 'Cause it just looks like they mean the same thing now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PHScanes

Almost the same


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saskia.schroeter

I also don't understand exactly what the translation means. Could someone rephrase it please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jamesalex1

Sometimes translating word for word doesn't work and we have to learn the translation of a phrase I think that applies here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saskia.schroeter

Precisely, this is what I was asking for. I would like to know if the phrase means somenthing like " I have been walking around [aimlessly]" or "I have been walking around [the tree]", or possibly both.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

Aimlessly is a perfect definition for "por aí".

But it can also be literaly: through there / around there


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anothernobody

I have walked around / I have been walking around - are both correct? reno300 had asked this, and I too would like to know, please


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

Have been walking around is the ultimately best answer.

The other would be ok when adding a duration to the present perfect, with the sentence still true today:

  • I have walked around for years = Eu tenho andado por aí faz anos
  • I have walked around since I left = Eu tenho andado por aí desde que parti

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jamesalex1

Oh right. I hope a native speaker can answer. "Por aí" has at least two translations to about and aroundhttp://www.wordreference.com/pten/a%C3%AD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jamesalex1

as well as "therabouts",


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/POLSKAdoBOJU

I believe "andado" has not accepted in an previous sentence for "to be walking around." DL only accepted "caminhando."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Josu594722

"Walking around" também é equivalente a "andar pra lá e pra cá", que também usamos muito aqui no Brasil.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/POLSKAdoBOJU

Why is para (pra) used in this expression, but por is used in por aí?

Learn Portuguese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.