"Lui va, io vado."

Translation:He goes, I go.

February 13, 2013

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/John.Burgess

Love me, love my dog.

February 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Elena18

Wasn't "viene" translated as "come" a minute ago? Is this a different verb?

March 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Aneliksis

Andare=go (vado, vai, va, andiamo, andate, vanno) Venire=come (vengo, vieni, viene, veniamo, venite, vengono)

April 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/cha.n-j

I'm having huge problems separating those as well..

April 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Timggilbert

he's going, i'm going sounds better

February 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ot246
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Different circumstances. He's going, I'm going would be "Lui รจ andando, io sono andando" implying that the man and I would be going right at this moment in time. Saying "Lui va, io vado" implies (at least in English) that IF he goes, THEN I go. This phrase is often used as a condition or threat to a situation.

Sometimes there is the implied meaning of WHERE he goes, I go... but this doesn't sound like the case in this phrase.

November 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/mlight
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I thought that coming & going (venir) could be interchangable in many instances.

March 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/LatecomerLaurie
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(American English speaker) I come toward something but I go away from it, if that helps any.

April 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Erick_Gomez

this would be an awsome sentance when your brother or best friend has to go to the army :')

July 25, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/lukman.A
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Which is the right one, "Andante" or "Andate"? Grazie mille

August 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Lloydo3000

Andate (just look at andare, no extra n!) Read up on this for more info http://www.duolingo.com/comment/671633?from_skill=0a7ab6a4c34344367a6bbc8381f9ab4b

August 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/lukman.A
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Thanks for your replying!^^ I love music and I'm so interested in Italian musical term. In musical term, how can it become "Andante" since it also means that "the tempo is just like walking."?

August 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Lloydo3000

I guess they are related, but I think andante is only used when referring to tempo. I'm just a beginner though!

August 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/daviddpianist

Text stress is wrong:

VAdo, not vaDO

February 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/708
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It's leviOOOOOsa not, levioSA

May 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/rscar
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Honestly, she's a nightmare!

March 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/gabejosh
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No, she isn't! I love her!!!!

April 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/JennaHO
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I am having a hard time remembering these conjugations as they do not all start the same... any one have a good tip on remembering them?

January 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Lloydo3000
  • io is always stem + o
  • tu is always stem + i
  • lui is always stem + e unless it is an -are verb, then stem + a
  • noi is always stem + iamo
  • voi is always the infinitive with the last r replaced by a te
  • loro is always stem + ono unless it is an -are verb, then stem + ano

Please note that there are many exceptions, which http://italian.about.com will be happy to tell you about.

From http://www.duolingo.com/comment/671633

January 30, 2014
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