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  5. "Lui va, io vado."

"Lui va, io vado."

Translation:He goes, I go.

February 13, 2013

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John.Burgess

Love me, love my dog.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elena18

Wasn't "viene" translated as "come" a minute ago? Is this a different verb?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aneliksis

Andare=go (vado, vai, va, andiamo, andate, vanno) Venire=come (vengo, vieni, viene, veniamo, venite, vengono)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cha.n-j

I'm having huge problems separating those as well..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Timggilbert

he's going, i'm going sounds better


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ot246

Different circumstances. He's going, I'm going would be "Lui รจ andando, io sono andando" implying that the man and I would be going right at this moment in time. Saying "Lui va, io vado" implies (at least in English) that IF he goes, THEN I go. This phrase is often used as a condition or threat to a situation.

Sometimes there is the implied meaning of WHERE he goes, I go... but this doesn't sound like the case in this phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mlight

I thought that coming & going (venir) could be interchangable in many instances.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LatecomerLaurie

(American English speaker) I come toward something but I go away from it, if that helps any.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erick_Gomez

this would be an awsome sentance when your brother or best friend has to go to the army :')


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lukman.A

Which is the right one, "Andante" or "Andate"? Grazie mille


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lloydo3000

Andate (just look at andare, no extra n!) Read up on this for more info http://www.duolingo.com/comment/671633?from_skill=0a7ab6a4c34344367a6bbc8381f9ab4b


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lukman.A

Thanks for your replying!^^ I love music and I'm so interested in Italian musical term. In musical term, how can it become "Andante" since it also means that "the tempo is just like walking."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lloydo3000

I guess they are related, but I think andante is only used when referring to tempo. I'm just a beginner though!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daviddpianist

Text stress is wrong:

VAdo, not vaDO


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/708

It's leviOOOOOsa not, levioSA


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rscar

Honestly, she's a nightmare!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gabejosh

No, she isn't! I love her!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JennaHO

I am having a hard time remembering these conjugations as they do not all start the same... any one have a good tip on remembering them?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lloydo3000
  • io is always stem + o
  • tu is always stem + i
  • lui is always stem + e unless it is an -are verb, then stem + a
  • noi is always stem + iamo
  • voi is always the infinitive with the last r replaced by a te
  • loro is always stem + ono unless it is an -are verb, then stem + ano

Please note that there are many exceptions, which http://italian.about.com will be happy to tell you about.

From http://www.duolingo.com/comment/671633

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