"Fan hyn"

Translation:Here

November 25, 2016

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/androsgo

How does this differ from 'yma'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rmcode
Mod
Plus
  • 2449

It's a contraction of 'Y fan hyn' = This place

In use it is almost exactly equivalent to 'yma' with maybe a bit more emphasis.

eg: - 'Dere (y)ma! = Come here! (Tyrd yma! in NW)

Dere fan hyn! = Come (by) here!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasoFflandrys

I always understood 'fan hen' and had no idea where it could possibly come from :/ Kudos to duolingo :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/androsgo

Diolch yn fawr. In the NW could you say, "Tyrd fan hyn"? Thanks for a taste of the difference in dialect, I am wanting to learn more of that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibisc

Various forms are used in different dialects and for different shades of meaning, just as in English - here, over here, right here, just here, on the spot, over by here, etc.

There are about five main dialect areas in Wales and variations within them as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/androsgo

Thanks for the information!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shwmae

You often hear fa'ma (from y fan yma) in north Wales with same meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Randybvain

Why is it hyn and not hwn or hon (my dictionary shows that man could be of either gender)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shwmae

Why is it hyn? It's basically a strange exception that's become a set phrase. For almost all singular nouns you can basically say it's either going to be hwn (masc.) or hon (fem.), but there are one or two phrases that break this rule.

The only other one you'll probably ever come across is when hynny "that" is used with pryd "time" (masc.) - pryd hynny "then, at that time".

Learn Welsh in just 5 minutes a day. For free.