"Hova fut a pap kutyája?"

Translation:Where does the priest's dog run?

1 year ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Krisbaudi
Krisbaudi
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If I understand it right, is: Hova - where TO Hol - where Answer: Where does the priest's dog run TO. I think, without TO, it means: Hol fut a pap kutyája.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/96314081311257

English doesn't differentiate strictly between "where" "where to", so the given English sentence is correct, but yours should be accepted too.

For clarification:

Hol fut a kutya? - A parkban. (the dog is already in the park is running inside the park)

Hová fut a kutya? - A parkba. (the dog is not in the park, but it's running towards it, will eventually end up in the park)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Krisbaudi
Krisbaudi
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Then it is quite difficult for native english speakers, to understand the situation, if they don't make a distinction. But at least here it could be clearly expressed for everybody.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joeintheory

In English, it's possible to say unclear sentences like these, and the grammar is correct. But they're still bad sentences, because they're unclear. A good english speaker would be more clear (unless it is already known from context)

Similarly, I also find it difficult because where does the dog run? and where is the dog running? have very different meanings in English, but this difference isn't in Magyar. I think that's similar to the lack of movement words in English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey
vvsey
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It is really interesting how Hungarian deals with what Engish does with the simple and progressive tenses. Of course, a Hungarian would never know or feel the need for the various tenses until she or he is exposed to, for example, English. Then it takes some getting used to. And it takes even more time to recognize the ways Hungarian expresses the same concepts, without the use of the tense variations.
It can be a different word order. It can be an added preverb. It can be a split preverb. Or it can be a different verb. An example for the latter:
"Iskolába megyek" - I am going to school.
"Iskolába járok" - I go to school.

All languages have their ways to express anything they want. If they lack something, they borrow from other languages. We just need to figure out the sometimes surprising ways various languages use to express the same thing. Oh, the human mind....

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bastette54

The ultra-correct (and somewhat antiquated) way to translate this would be "To where is the priest's dog running?" But English speakers have long abandoned the rule that you can't end a sentence with a preposition, so "Where is the priest's dog running to" is widely accepted. I agree with Krisbaudi and Joeintheory that this is better than "Where ..dog running?" because it's clearer. Otherwise it sounds like the dog is someplace running around, and the speaker wants to know where that is. If "Where... running to?" is rejected, then it should definitely be added. But I'm answering a 6-month-old post, so I hope that's already been fixed.

English used to have a word that specifically meant "to where" (just like "hova"): "whither." But that one is long gone.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patricia460976

I like the word "whither" and think we should bring it back. As well as the other directional variants "whence" and "thence."

English is deteriorating rapidly. Much like our country under the present regime. Not quite as fast, though.

1 year ago
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