1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: German
  4. >
  5. "An deinem großen Abend darfs…

"An deinem großen Abend darfst du alles entscheiden."

Translation:On your big evening you can decide everything.

February 21, 2014

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SydneyBlakem

On your big evening you may make all the decisions. Marked wrong but I think it means the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HCDaria

While the sentiment may be the same, the actual word "decision" isn't in the German sentence, so I'd agree with Duo on this one. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pellucidon

Yes, "your big evening" sounds strange. I've only ever heard "your big night".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gramakri

I used the word permitted instead of allowed and was marked wrong. This should not be so since both the words mean the same


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rejnald

Why do we use Dative here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fenix_vulgaris

"An" (at) is a preposition that can occur with both dative and accusative. When it is used to describe a space, it is fairly easy. A movement that stays within the given space is described with dative a movement into the space with accusative. Here, "an" is used for time, where English would use "on". Again, dative describes an action within the given time frame. (The accusative is not really used with an for time. You would rather see "bis".) Here, the evening sets the time frame for the complete action, so "an" and dative are used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OldSpiceGuy

On another example, entscheiden was reflexive. Why isn't it here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seoman6

"etwas entscheiden": to decide something. usually for someone else or for a group: He decides when we leave tonight.

"sich entscheiden": more like "to make up one's mind": He made up his mind when he wants to leave tonight.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nicomiro

I put "For your big evening you may decide everything" and the "For" is not accepted. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/montraydavis

Well, I think that for your big night would be more like something you are going to do FOR someone on their big night as opposed to doing something ON their big night.

For instance....

For your birthday, [I gave you $100], [we went to the movies], [I will do this or that] ... To me, in English this doesn't specify a definite time. The action was just done 'for' the birthday .

On your birthday, [we will walk], [I will give you $100], [I want to go swimming] ..... Clearly, every action mentioned here will be done ON the day of the birthday..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/markbooth

"On your big evening"? I'm struggling to think of a context where such a phrase would be used by a native English speaker. Surely there must be a better translation than this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pellucidon

We might say "In the evening of your big day you can decide everything" but "You can decide everything on your big night" may be a bit closer to the intended meaning. We say "your big day" and "your big night" but I've never heard "your big evening" or "your big morning".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/larboi

On your big night you can choose everything? Why is that marked wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Puett

"Können" und "dürfen" are NOT the same! Ich DARF die Tür öffnen, aber KANN ich es?

Learn German in just 5 minutes a day. For free.