"On ne peut les imaginer sans cet objet."

Translation:We cannot imagine them without this object.

6 years ago

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/lexm
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apparently there are three verbs in French which do not 'require' pas in the negative cesser, oser and pouvoir http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/negation_form_3.htm

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MLab04

I believe "savoir" can also function without the "pas" in certain situations. Ie. Je ne sais quoi...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rebekasto
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I copied this from the page above: savoir, is a special case. It doesn't need pas when it

1) means "to be uncertain"

Je ne sais si c'est juste. I don't know if it's fair.

2) is in the conditional

Je ne saurais t'aider. I wouldn't know how to help you.

3) is used with a interrogative word

Je ne sais quoi faire. I don't know what to do.

However, savoir does need pas when it means to know a fact or how to do something:

Je ne sais pas la réponse. I don't know the answer.

<pre>Il ne sait pas nager. </pre>

He doesn't know how to swim.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew48

Note that it's a literary negation, though, so it's not something you'd expect to hear in speech.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaTall

i'm getting curious what object we are talking about :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/porkcfish

Si tu dois demander... on ne te dira jamais.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maverickpl
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Since there was no "pas", I put "No one can imagine them without this object." Would on ne ever mean no one?

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alphabeta
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I don't think so; personne is used for no-one

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mgeraght
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No. No one would be "personne" so the french version of your sentence would be "personne ne peut les imaginer sans cet objet"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cephlin
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On means we

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mgeraght
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On does not mean we. It is similar to how, in english, the general "we do this in America" or "you always drive in the right lane is used," but the reason we use those replacements is that we do not have a gender-neutral third person pronoun. The french do, it's "on"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew48

"On" can mean "we", however. In casual speech, "nous" is rarely used, and is almost always replaced by "on."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cephlin
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Exactly. Since one would rarely speak like this in English, one might be inclined to translate it as we or you instead.

We are much more likely to use we than one.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cephlin
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"we do not have a gender-neutral third person pronoun"

One might disagree with that statement.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chrissy77

The translation doesn't seem to make any sense. Is "object" the right word here?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/willijanb

As in, a parent cannot imagine her child without his blankie (blanket).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolHarrison
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"Thing" is a synonym for "object" yet was not accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

I've had this disagreement with DL before. Someone suggested that "chose" is "thing" and "objet" is "object", but there's a question of what is colloquial. I think "objet" is much more colloquial in French than "object" is in English. We're are much, much more likely to say "thing". Reported. Again.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/janatha
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Why is there no "pas" in this particular sentence when we have always used it with pouvoir in the past?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/antlane
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the ne littéraire---""""certain verbs and constructions need ne but not pas in order to be negative""""Cesser, oser, and pouvoir never need pas."""""

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

So....does "ne littéraire" imply we are only likely to come across it in literature and very elevated speech? Is it like the passé simple?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KenAndresen

I find it interesting that "on" translated as "we" still uses the third person singular "peut" as the verb form.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

It is still "on" in French, and takes its usual verb form.

The pronoun "on" is quite ordinary in French, while in English, the direct translation, "one", is rare/formal, so translating them directly means you are altering the tone of the sentence. It's not wrong, per se, but it's usually truer to the meaning if you use a different pronoun - "we" or "you" - and in that case, of course, the verb in English goes with the pronoun used.

I hope that's clear.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jollygosh9

Baffled as to why 'thing' wrong. An object is a thing, and a thing is an object.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew48

An idea can be called a thing, but not an object, as can any number of non-physical things. thing = chose, truc

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Boredomramsey

This phrase is vague, unnatural and doesn't make much sense. Who is "them"? What is "this object" and why would its absence defy imagination? Not well suited for teaching a language.

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/antlane
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I think...soccer players..butchers...teachers...ball...couteau...livres

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chce_polski

It's not possible to imagine them without that object.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

I think that's too far a stretch. In actual translation, depending on the tone and meaning of the text, you might decide that this is the best interpretation. But while we're still learning, it's probably best not to get overly creative, and stick, as much as is practical, to a more straightforward translation.

3 years ago
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