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  5. "Usate bene il vostro tempo!"

"Usate bene il vostro tempo!"

Translation:Use your time well!

December 1, 2016

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlenaChern6

My 'use your time wisely' was accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/csvicc_

Is this a good phrase in English? Just wondering (not a native speaker)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnthonyBar23923

If you directly translate this word for word to English, it is not a very well spoken phrase. "Usate bene il vostro tempo" directly translates to "use well your time", which sounds a bit weird in American English. "Use your time well" sounds much better.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malLove

Yes it's difficult the way it seems mixed up. Still can't get a handle on it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PATRICKPIZ1

your explanation doesn't make sense. you would not translate something into gibberish just because italians usually place an adverb directly after the verb. translations are made from one language (being used grammatically) into another language (in a grammatically correct form). since languages evolve separately from one another, there is no one-to-one correspondence between them. translating word-for-word is just a lucky, occasional occurrence. "use your time well" is duo's go to answer. and it is good grammatical english.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bob860250

"Make good use of your time" was accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonRGB

imperativo presente (usàre)

ùsa (non usàre) tu

ùsi egli

usiàmo noi

usàte voi

ùsino essi


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meSopy

Is it possible to say: "Usate il vostro tempo bene?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PATRICKPIZ1

you can say anything. but 'bene' almost always follows the verb directly. not putting it there would skew the meaning of the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meSopy

Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Myriam212055

"Use your time wisely" is correct too!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PATRICKPIZ1

i would agree that, in a casual sense, they are synonymous. though, i can imagine a conversation where Gandalf corrects Bilbo by saying, "not well but wisely." then the difference would be significant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard515811

Il sounds too much like e

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