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https://www.duolingo.com/psionpete

Behold the man!

psionpete
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In the Peoples skill there is a question to translate the sentence "Behold the man". This was on the iOS App where I had to select the correct answer from a list of individual words. The correct answer was "Se mennesket" which I do not understand as "the man" we are taught is "mannen".

Can anyone explain why it is "Se mennesket"?

1 year ago

4 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Zzzzz...
Zzzzz...
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I think this is a set phrase. This is a line credited to Pontius Pilate ("Ecce homo"). In some cultures, you cannot use words like "man" or "mankind" to refer to all people. The Norwegian word "mannen" refers strictly to men only, so you need "mennesket" to refer to human beings. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/garpike
garpike
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Indeed, 'homo' is not specifically male, but essentially means 'one from the earth', and is cognate with 'humus' ('soil') and, indeed, the English word 'earth'.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zzzzz...
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Exactly. A male person would be "vir". I think the problem here is that the traditional English translation of this phrase seems a bit old-fashioned nowadays. Or if not old-fashioned, then at least not very PC. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/psionpete
psionpete
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Thanks, I think I can understand that although it seems a badly worded question at this stage in the course to include an idiomatic phrase which cannot be translated literally.

1 year ago