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"Él está muy nervioso."

Translation:He is very nervous.

5 years ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/phototimmermans

"Very nervous" and "quite nervous" have different meanings in English. The differences are found in their degree, and where you say them. In my Australian/Canadian English "quite nervous" is not nearly as "nervous" as "very nervous". Here's an interesting usage point from ldoceonline.com: "In British English, using quite suggests you are not very enthusiastic about something. In American English, quite is a stronger way of qualifying an adjective. In both British and American English, the way you say the word is important. In British English, if you say It was quite good and you put the emphasis on the quite, you mean it was good, but not very good. If you put the emphasis on good, you mean it was very good. In British English, when it is used with adjectives like impossible or unacceptable, it means completely, and you put the emphasis on it. In American English, the emphasis is always on the adjective that goes with quite." With intensifiers, like "quite", often tone is everything. If a guy tells a girl in the US that she is "quite pretty" it may be OK, but in Britain, he might be lucky to ever get another date!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lastnightilie
lastnightilie
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I'm American and I also thought "quite" was a lot weaker than "very." I don't think "pretty" has the same meaning either... if you say something is "pretty good," that means it was only okay, certainly not "very good." I think "muy" only means "very" so I wish they would be more precise on Duolingo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wischile

I still have no idea how "pretty nervous" is a good translation of "muy nervioso"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/monfad
monfad
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More irritating when the 'correct' answer is said to be 'he HAS more nervous'! This is pretty,very,quite,ridiculous.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/happyhealt

Nervi oso. Hey if there were a bear here I would be nerviOSO also!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amitbenb
amitbenb
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Can you say that "muy nervioso" means "pretty nervous"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Unless Duo sees "pretty" and thinks "bonito" or "lindo." ;)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amitbenb
amitbenb
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It seems a bit forced to me. I lost a multiple choice question because of this (I chose only "very nervous"). Maybe they should add a "don't-care" option for multiple choice questions because IMO "very nervous" is a better translation.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ronzo-uno

This section is about feelings, so why are they presenting nearly-similar meanings of "muy"? For any native Spanish speakers, can you explain why this is important?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elin10921

I would have written 'He is very nervous' if 'very' had been among the words I could choose from. I don’t think 'pretty' is the right word to use here.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TinaJohns

I agree that "pretty" doesn't work here. "Muy" means "very" "pretty" is "bonito" " lindo" " guapo"; "pretty nervous" would be "bastante nervioso", "muy nervioso" means " very nervous"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/defiantoli

I'd vote to say that muy doesn't really translate into quite.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitcorb

Add rather as another possible modifier.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Snake2290
Snake2290
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Is "he is so nervous" a correct alternative?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/teste2teste

Can be : Angry ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Funky_Puppy

No, angry and nervous are two very different things. According to dictionary.com. angry means feeling or showing anger or strong resentment (usually followed by at, with, or about)

Nervousness is highly excitable; unnaturally or acutely uneasy or apprehensive: to become nervous under stress. 2. of or relating to the nerves : nervous tension. 3. affecting the nerves : nervous diseases. 4. suffering from, characterized by, or originating in disordered nerves. 5. characterized by or attended with acute uneasiness or apprehension:

So, you see, the word nerviso would only work with nervous, not with angry.

Hope this helps!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nvisible29

I hear a clear 'v' sound in "nervioso", bur not 'b'. Why is it so?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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The letters 'v' and 'b' only sound like /b/ at the beginning of a phrase, after a pause, or after 'n' and 'm'. Otherwise they sound more similar to /v/.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DD.Waldemar

Quite is not equivalent to muy.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dprbreck

I'll just say it again (I guess DL doesn't like the comment?): Muy nervioso in Spain means "VERY ANXIOUS" AND "VERY NERVOUS"

Ask a native speaker. I'm not one, but I have asked several and confirmed it after seeing the error here in DuoLingo but also using Notes in Spanish's tutorials where they dive very deeply into this. It's both a false friend and a friend.

Again: This is Spain. Not sure what other countries use so keep in mind. That's the biggest challenge in this language is different countries have different meanings for phrases and words. Would be helpful if DL would acknowledge this and allow for it in responses.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espofleet
espofleet
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There is no place for accents. This is the fourth time I send this message

7 months ago