"A saia da menina está comprida."

Translation:The girl's skirt is long.

2/14/2013, 8:14:00 PM

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/whitebox

Isn't the verb 'ser' more appropriate to use in this sentence?

10/9/2013, 1:03:01 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/pancakeparfait

I answered "The girl's skirt is long." Where is the extent of the length implied? está or comprida? Or is it understood somehow?

2/14/2013, 8:14:00 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/erudis
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  • A saia da menina é comprida = The girl's skirt is long.
  • A saia da menina está comprida = The girl's skirt is longer than it should be.

The verb "estar" usually express a "changeable" or a temporary state, instead of a state of being. It doesn't express an inherent trait of something, and that's why you say "eu estou triste" / "I'm sad" (at the moment), and not "eu sou triste" / "I'm sad" (sad is a part of my personality).

2/15/2013, 7:51:09 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/pancakeparfait

This is a really concise, well-explained answer. It makes sense! Thank you erudis :)

2/17/2013, 10:16:07 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/delvi
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Erudis, your explanation makes sense, but should that not be explained in the translation when one hovers over the word?

2/20/2013, 6:34:39 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Lingodingle

But does that make it "too" long, just because it is "changeable".

3/10/2013, 1:06:40 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/kcmurphy
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I know that in Spanish in phrases where both "ser" and "estar" can be used, when "ser" is used it conveys that the object is always a certain way, and "estar" conveys that it is not as normal.

Can anyone comment on this interpretation in Portuguese?

6/20/2013, 4:43:22 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/djeidot
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You're right, "ser" and "estar" in Portuguese mean the same as in Spanish. I just disagree with a small point: "estar" does not necessarily mean abnormal. It just expresses your current state. You can say "Estou bem" (I'm fine), that's as normal as it can be...

11/17/2013, 10:23:29 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/gilpaiz

it makes sense, thanks

2/19/2013, 10:23:39 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/-HKBK-
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Thank you erudis!

3/7/2013, 7:30:44 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Mallowigi
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What is the use of comprida instead of longa? Is it only for clothes?

6/8/2013, 5:49:21 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/erudis
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"Comprido" and 'longo" are synonyms, their usages are based on phonetic preferences. Those kind of things are only learned (usually) by listening to a lot of sentences and getting an intuitive understanding of which adjective to use.

6/15/2013, 12:57:43 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/samosborn88

And to piggy-back, what is the difference between longe and longa? are they just both adjectives describing different nouns?

6/14/2013, 10:14:27 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/erudis
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"Longe" is an adverb that means "far", it has nothing to do with "longo/a".

6/15/2013, 12:57:19 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/lesliegirl

I was confusing the word Comprida, thinking that it meant "bought" or "purchased". Because doesn't the word "comprar" mean "to buy"? Maybe I'm confusing it with the Spanish vocabulary.

2/4/2014, 11:59:32 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/djeidot
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The word you're looking for is "comprada". "Comprada" is a conjugation of the verb "comprar", meaning buy/purchase. "Comprida" comes from "comprimento", which means length.

2/5/2014, 12:21:28 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/lesliegirl

That makes sense. I didn't realize the difference.
Muito obrigada djeidot.

2/5/2014, 2:32:02 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/CoyoteV

Since my native language is Spanisch, (which I've been teaching in Germany for over 20 years now) I understand well the differences between SER und ESTAR. Yes, I get the meaning, but I would say it is very unusual to use ESTAR here. It's an unlucky example for people still learning the differences between SER & ESTAR, because, without context, even native speakers will first think someone is describing the skirt (a quality) and that's what SER is for. The idea that in this case, it's about a state (something unusual, just this time) isn't clear at all. Perhaps if you add "Hoje," it would be clearer, and those not having the 2 forms of "to be" in their native languages would be less confused.... just an observation.

11/2/2018, 9:32:03 AM
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