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  5. "Ella puede partir ese queso."

"Ella puede partir ese queso."

Translation:She can cut that cheese.

February 14, 2013

104 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brianfarris

does "cutting the cheese" have some other significance?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/suezq

Yes brianfarris it is american slang for farting!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jmiker54

I always chuckle when i read this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bluebunny84ppg

I think about Handkase mit Musik, a German cheese that comes out the other end quickly, when reading this...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Si_Robertson

does it have that same significants in Spanish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mechbubo

That phrase does not have other meanings in Spanish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tadhg620375

I once ran across a saying in Spanish that states "a professional knows how to cut the cheese", meaning someone who can do something well. It is something like: "un profesional sabe cómo cortar el queso".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ianterrell

Sounds similar to the phrase "cut the mustard"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tadhg620375

It's what the British call trumping.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/langlearnerZeke

I don't care if you call me immature, I'll laugh at this sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rmcgwn

Just in case someone else wonders what verb to use if it were "She can leave that cheese" you can't use partir in this context, you will use dejar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daltonfp

Thanks rmcgwn. That helps because I translated "partir" as "leave".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/evaestrellita71

Thank you...that answered my question. Why in the heck indicate in the boxes below that partir means to leave?@# And yet not include its' other meanings of parting or cutting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miguel33040

Thanks, that is what i was looking for


[deactivated user]

    Could one use 'cortar' here instead and which is more common and where (Spain vs South America)?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lunzie

    Yes, I did and it was considered correct.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/through2014

    I just did use cortar and was marked wrong.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cynduja

    why cant we translate this as she is able to cut that cheese as opposed to she can cut that cheese? the first one is seen to be wrong.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MJMGruver

    I said the same thing. I don't know why it isn't accepted.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mkljohnson

    Why is that cheese "ese queso" and not "eso queso" isn't the cheese the direct object?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdabell

    ese is the masculine adjective appropriate to queso. Eso is a gender neutral pronoun and, therefore, never changes.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elleperez

    !!! thank you! eso/ese/esa makes so much sense now, it was seemingly arbitrary before but I hadn't picked up on the gender pattern.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynnecover

    If "eso" is gender neutral, then why isn't it used exclusively? Probably a dumb question but I'll ask it anyway.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kcmurphy

    Grammatical gender does not correspond with biological gender. "Ese" and "esa" do not have sexist connotations. In grammar, you use neuter words like "eso" when you don't know what the object is, what its gender (not biological gender!) is, or when you are referring to an idea or situation.

    This is hard for English speakers to grasp since English has not had gendered words for many centuries, but you'll get there!

    If you want to read more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grammatical_gender


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/theRealRabbit

    Sooooo.... aren't 'ese' and 'eso'........ oh! 'Ese' is masculine! Ha!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ayoungethan

    Perhaps grammatical and biological gender don't respond, but they do significantly influence one another. For example: psychologytoday.com/blog/culture-conscious/201209/masculine-or-feminine-and-why-it-matters


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wazzie

    Eso is only used when one is unsure of the gender of an item
    What is that? *¿Qué es eso?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SD-77

    So can I. Real bad.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SqueezeboxSarah

    ... and clear the room.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Minecraftbot

    extremely legitimate laugh.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spanishchuck639

    cheese typically has a neutral odor when it still has the rind on it, limburger cheese has an especially ripe odor when cut ... thus the american slang, thus the reason I have a smile, I apologize, I enjoy a wee bit of scatological humor now and again. Thanks duo for the unintentional guffaw.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vicki.kura

    Oh, I think they do these intentionally. :) I'm glad they do. It lightens your mood while learning and we tend to remember these sentences/words much better.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CliffJonesJr

    I noticed that the hover text for "queso" includes "racket". So could this phrase mean to "cut that racket" (i.e., "be quiet")?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amorelan

    Why not she can share that cheese? I thought partir meant to share!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenP7

    Usually it means something like "cut and share" or "divide out and share" when it's used like that. The word for just "share" is compartir. Hope that helps!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/donrua1

    For those newly familiar with the american meaning of the phrase, you may enjoy this comnercial. It also references two related phrases, "pinch a loaf" (defecate) and "pull my finger". http://youtu.be/7iBY7Yirq60


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Foomancrue

    Yeah girl, cut that cheese.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickMallar

    Heh. Heh-heh. Heh-heh. Check it out Butthead, they are talking about farts! Heh-heh.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rick.gomez

    !No te entras ese cuarto! Whooo! ;-)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dtmedic

    LOL...this one just cracked me up.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emilyjgarrick

    Does anyone know if I could have used the word "slice" here instead of cut? I don't like to say "cuts cheese" for the very reasons you've been discussing here.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbbyJaneway

    I don't think so. Rebanar is the verb for slice. And according to Google Translate, slice is an accepted definition for cortar but not for partir.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HagueAndrew

    Yes but in England we normally slice cheese an certainly never split it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ozgrlhan

    'divide' is accepted


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pink100j

    Ahhh, Duo's sense of humor.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_smiles_

    Lets cut the cheese, and the cut the rug (and dance).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bfarris

    In English we say "something cuts the mustard" . Does cutting the cheese have a similar meaning?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_pinkodoug_

    To cut the cheese is also a euphemism for breaking wind, at least in America. I don't think there's any particular meaning in this phrase in Spansh, though.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daltonfp

    Ha, ha. I am native english and I have not heard that euphemism. Now I can tell my kids, you cut the cheese!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/langlearnerZeke

    haha, but I couldn't help but laugh if a spanish-speaker said that


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArrigoDelaRoca

    No, cuts the mustard is positive, equals passing muster or up to par, whereas cheese cutting is juvenile humor.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/theRealRabbit

    You saying 'juvenile' just made me appreciate the etymological relation to 'joven'.


    [deactivated user]

      what about "cut up that cheese"?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdwardMarq3

      Yo puedo partir el queso.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkNeff727

      I've found that "partir" can mean cut,share,set off,break,depart,leave,fly off,drive away, and over a 3 dozen other things, how on earth can one know? Context? With over 3 dozen meanings how can context help at this point!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rogue1717

      Seriously? She can fart?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joatmoo

      I will never date her again!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamuelMcMurrin

      it depends on the cheese if she was cutting that sort of cheese Arby's is pretty cool!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErinB91

      This is the weirdest recurring sentence Duolingo gives me.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talca

      Why no "de" after partir?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elpeaelpea

      Partir also means to divide. I have asked that it be accepted.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jimcook546

      She is able to cut that cheese - come on DuoLingo - loosen up a bit


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahRobbi

      Is she may cut the cheese incorrect? There seems to be some inconsistency on can/may in the lesson.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heidi.dejo

      LOL lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol lol! That is so funny, oh my gosh!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jackbluthund

      She can part that cheese. is wrong?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/angus390025

      She is reminiscent of Moses, leading the Chosen Chips through a vat of molten Pancho's Mexican Buffet cheese with an army of jalapeños closing in behind her. Part, Great Cheese. God commands you!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arjuna725

      Oh can she???? Que peste


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joel618962

      One has to appreciate such base humor....yay


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamuelMcMurrin

      Arby's is pretty cool!!!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/8stringfan

      DL's greatest sentence.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keldration

      More of this, huh? Let 'er rip.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brian440156

      La oracion es perfecta para mi esposa!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WyltonTheWhyte

      Dear me...perhaps one for our American cousins when grandmama lets rip a particularly loud flabby woof woof!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoanMJames1

      partir means to divide, share...as well as leave, depart, set off....


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErlendKamr

      It sounds like she can really cut it


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oakwarden

      ¡Hala mi dedo!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doc802085

      She sure can! And boy, it sure doesn't smell good!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartaPareta

      DUOLIIIINGO!!!! Qué clase de Español estás enseñando??? PARTIR no es lo mismo que CORTAR! My friends: if you are going to use a knife, you are going to "cortar". If your are going to use your hands to brake a nugat, you are going to "partir". Is it clear? I´m getting angry...there are so so so many wrong translations on this Spanish course!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/corsybesma

      Wrong it partir means share


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nathanafi

      YEAH SHE CAN woooooooo!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michie580347

      Partir = to leave AND to cut?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdabell

      As it is, effectively, in English: to dePART, and to 'part the curtains'


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexFarrow2

      The word hint for "partir" doesnt include cutting!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/McqZRHFG

      Sorry, but isn't it important to ask whether 'partir' means 'to cut'? Why not 'cortar'? Loved the discussion, though.

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