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"Fuiste muy directa con él."

Translation:You were very frank with him.

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5 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/airandfingers

Why does this sentence use fuiste (ser) instead of estuviste (estar)? I would think "to be direct" would use estar, since (at least in this case) it's a way of acting, not a personality trait.

3
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kcmurphy
kcmurphyPlus
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It's an expression, it seems.

3
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gritajay

I see your point, but the sentence isn't commenting on her personality. It's just saying what she did.

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Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Razso

dude... it's an expression...

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Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tedb
tedb
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Not according to the lesson. I lost a heart for 'very', so I assume that 'muy directa' is idiomatic and just wonder whether there are other idiomatic uses of 'muy'.

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Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zazoom
Zazoom
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I translated the sentence as "you were very direct to him" but lost a heart because it supposed to be "you were very direct WITH him". So it did translate it as "very direct" and I guess it depends on which sentence you use? But ok, I'm not sure...

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Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdntinpusher

I don't understand how this verb can be both "ir" (to go) and "ser" (to be) at the same time. My previous usage of fuiste in this exercise was always equivalent to "You went to the castle," etc, and now it becomes "You were..." which rightly seems to be more in line with "estuviste."

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Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ajabrams

The same way many different verbs/words in english can have multiple meanings

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Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mattmoran

Apparently "You were very honest with him." is too loose a translation....

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Reply5 years ago