https://www.duolingo.com/troll1995

Help with a sentence's translation

troll1995
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I'm reading a book and I came across this sentence: Bhi Gráinne "millte" - 'sé sin le rá, bhí sí ina peata críochnaithe. I get the sentence except for the "peata críochnaithe". What does it mean? Thanks in advance!

1 year ago

4 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

It's possible that it's béarlachas but it means "a complete pet". Without knowing the context, the sentence could mean "Gráinne was spoiled rotten, that is to say she was an overindulged little princess", or it could mean "Gráinne was spoiled - that is to say she was an absolute dote".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/troll1995
troll1995
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Thanks a lot for the reply! I can't say for sure, but I don't think it's bearlachas, because the book is bilingual (Irish and english) but that part of the sentence is not translated into english (and the whole book seems to be written in irish first, and then translated to english, but that's my impression). It just says "Gráinne was spoilt".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

In English you can say that someone is an "absolute X" or a "complete X" or a "total X", or even "a complete and total X" and it means much the same thing. críochnaithe means "finished" and therefore "complete", but it's not necessarily "complete" in the sense of "absolute", so I think that peata críochnaithe might be béarlachas, because the "absolute" sense of "complete" made more sense to me in reading the sense that you gave. Having said that, it's a new idiom, and it makes as much sense as it does in English anyway, so it's not something that's clearly incorrect.

The NEID has another example: "he's an absolute fool" - amadán ceart críochnaithe is ea é

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Dinneen had

[…] {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}biṫeaṁnaċ críoċnuiġṫe, a perfect robber; {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}amadán críoċnuiġṫe, a “finished” fool.

in his entry for {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}críoċnuiġṫe (the pre-reform spelling of críochnaithe), so this meaning of the adjective doesn’t seem to be an anglicism (at least, not a recent one); peata in this sense could well be an anglicism, though.

EDIT: The eDIL has a couple of examples of peata in reference to people; the first example (in the order given there, not necessarily chronologically) is from the 17th century.

1 year ago
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