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  5. "Vado al ristorante."

"Vado al ristorante."

Translation:I go to the restaurant.

February 23, 2014

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asharadel

Does this mean it's;

Io vado

Tu vai

Lui/lei va

Voi andate

Noi andiamo

Loro vanno?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asharadel

Thanks, boschelena! I was uncertain. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BiggestBackflip

Can you use this verb tempus for saying "I AM GOING to the restaurant" or is there a separate tempus for doing stuff right now?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasWitnstein

Yes, ordinarily «Vado al ristorante.» would be translated as “I am going to the restaurant.”

Italian does have a separate present progressive tense+aspect, formed with the auxiliary ‘stare’=“to be”, followed by the gerund of the main verb.

In Italian (as in Spanish), the progressive aspect is only used to emphasize that an action is ongoing, either right now, or as a background process.
In English, in contrast, the present progressive aspect is the default for action verbs, the simple present being used only for habitual or regular action or in narrative sequences.

The auxiliary ‘stare’ is conjugated in the present tense as:

• io sto
• tu stai
• lui|lei sta
• noi stiamo
• voi state
• loro stanno

The gerund can be formed from the infinitive by substituting the endings as follows:

• -are → -ando
• -ere → -endo
• -ire → -endo

For example «Sto andando al ristorante.» = “I'm [in the middle of] going to the restaurant.”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dimitus

It's so frustrating not being able to look up conjugations inside duolingo now, especially since the 'report problem' button has had the option to type a problem removed as well...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SoniaLoram

Scusi, ma perchè "vado AL ristorante" e non "vado NEL ristorante"? Non capisco, c'è qualcuno che può aiutarme?

Sorry for my italian, please correct me :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/d.batta

"Vado nel ristorante" is grammatically correct but nobody would use it: we would rather say "ENTRO nel ristorante", with a little more emphasis on the fact of getting into the physical space of the restaurant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SoniaLoram

Then, it is always preferable to use "vado+a+luogo" and "entro+in+luogo".

Grazie, d.batta!! Sei molto gentile!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bjojoe

But that means go in or enter the ristorante. "Vado al ristorante."

(Translation: I go to the restaurant.) means walk or go from a place yor are at the moment (your home or hotel) to the restaurant. When you arrive at the restaurant, then you enter the restaurant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2668

You can arrive at a place without entering inside. You can correctly say that you're "at the restaurant" while you're sitting in your car in the parking lot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gracielaom

"Vado Ai ristorante" can I use "ai"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2668

No. ai is a+i and i is for certain masculine plurals. "ristorante" is masculine but singular. If it were the plural "ristoranti", then it would be ai ristoranti.

https://ciaoitaliablog.wordpress.com/classes/italian-preposition-with-definite-article/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IJEK3

Heyy guysss, what is the different between VADO and ANDARE????? /


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2668

vado is "I go", "andare" is the infinitive "to go". It's irregular.

ANDARE
io vado
tu vai
lui/lei va
noi andiamo
voi andate
loro vanno


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nasser606264

Where I can find a grammar rules


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

On the internet. There are many of them - all you have to do is search for what you want to know in specific terms. Different sources have differing quality of articles on various topics, so one source is not always the best. Amazon.com probably has plenty of books on Italian grammar - just get one that was edited recently.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nasser606264

Io vado Tu vai Lui/lie va Noi andiamo Voi andate Loro vanno


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

If you put two spaces at the ends of line, you get things lined up rather than in one long "sentence"
io vado
tu vai
lui/lei va (not lie)
noi andiamo
voi andate
loro vanno

Each of the above lines just has two spaces at the end to make new lines.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mahkizmo

hmm. i wrote "I walk to the restaurant" which wasn't correct, suppose to be "go" while vado can mean walk/go. You don't use vado when using another kind of transport e.g car, bike.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

No, that's not true. While I've seen andare use to mean "to walk" in limited cases, it's also used in sentences like Noi viviamo in New York, ed andiamo in Europa ogni settimana. Not possible to go by walking in this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gavin629

why does andare translate to so many words that don't seem to even correlate with it like va and vado? Most other words at least have a similar look when you are describing the party the word is describing like "We look" is "Guardiamo" which makes sense since to look is guardare yet I don't see any (v)s in andare.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2668

"Andare" conjugates into different forms. English doesn't conjugate as thoroughly as other languages do, but for example we have "I go" and "he goes".

As for the conjugations not looking like the infinitive, English has "to be" and "am/is/are/was/were". Or the past tense of "to go", which is "went". Irregular verbs happen for historical reasons. Sometimes it's a whole bunch of sound change as the language evolves, but a lot of times it's something called suppletion, which basically just means the root inflects unpredictably, often because early in, a different word was brought in and they merged semantically.

Italian evolved from Latin, and this word was irregular in Latin.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzQvhtYgb2Q


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BevClark3

Does anyone else find the number of new verbs in this exercise way too many? Im starting to think of giving up on Italian. I have been looking so many things up in a dictionary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PiotrekSob2

Why can't I translate it as "I go into the restaurant"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KimPNg

how can i know Vado means see or go


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hollandbieber

Can somebody explain how to learn all the verbs bc it's vary each n every single verbs ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2668

Most -- not all, but most -- verbs in Italian are regular, which means that if you know the infinitive, you can apply a simple template and know the conjugation.


https://i.imgur.com/8atYu1Y.png

It has been explained on this page a few times, however, that andare is irregular, and the present indicative looks like this:

io vado
tu vai
lui/lei va
noi andiamo
voi andate
loro vanno


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bujan222

"Vado al ristorante" is happening right now? Like, "I'm going"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2668

In English where we say "I go" or "I am going", in Italian they say "(io) vado".

If you want to emphasize that you're in the middle of going right now, that you're on your way as we speak, you would say "(io) sto andando".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertdeGr20

There's a bit of confusion in DuoLingo's head about the present simple 'I go to the restaurant' and present continuous "I am going to the restaurant.' Agreed, they both translate 'Vado al ristorante.'

I cannot, however remember ever in the last 60 years using the sentence 'I go to the restaurant' because it is only used when done regularly, habitually. E.g. 'I go the restaurant every Friday..'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juan738101

Vada a bordo, cazzo!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardElm4

Sometimes their speaking is confusing: to me this sounds like "da vado.."

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