https://www.duolingo.com/Shahrazad26

Anneciğim ve kızıcığım

Or is it Annecim ve kızıcım?

I hear these words used often in Turkish soaps. They seem to mean "dear mom" and "dear daughter". They also place this cim suffix at the end of any name or noun to mean dear. Is this a real Turkish suffix?

1 year ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mkarabiy

It is Turkish/Turkic -cik suffix, and -im for my. Anneciğim or Kızcığım. But when spoken sometimes they are shortened and pronounced as annecim or kızcım. -cik suffix is for diminutive effect. When used for people it implies affection too. For others, it is generally just diminutive.

some examples:

Küçük (small) küçücük (very small)

Ufak (small) ufacık (very small)

Az (few/not enough) azıcık

Some place names with -cik suffix:

Lake Yalchık

Nalchık

Osmancık

Also Muncuk Han (Boncuk in today's Turkish, small ball, bead often for jewelry)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Selcen_Ozturk
Selcen_Ozturk
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kızcığım or kızcım doesn't really exist though, it sounds super weird to me and I have never heard it. I guess because kız itself is anyway sort of diminutive, I don't know. Similarly yeğenciğim (nephew) or toruncuğum (grandchild) also sound very odd.

But in general you can add it to people's names to say "my dear ...", like Ayşeciğim, Selcenciğim, Shahrazadcığım etc. You can combine with canım, canım anneciğim etc. Be careful, if you only say Ayşecik, Selcencik etc this is more like making fun of someone.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mkarabiy

That is right, people do not say kızcığım. I only wrote it since Shahrazad26 wrote she heard it from Turkish soaps. Also as you said, name-cik sounds condescending.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Selcen_Ozturk
Selcen_Ozturk
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maybe she actually heard kuzucum : ) many moms call their kids kuzucum

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shahrazad26

That is probably what they said, thanks.

Along the same line as kuzucum, in the soaps they often call their male sons aslanım, which gets translated as my lion. Sometimes they say aslan oğlüm (I think), which gets translated as my lionine son, which sounds quite weird in English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Selcen_Ozturk
Selcen_Ozturk
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yes it is common to say aslanım/aslan oğlum. Especially in Muhteşem Yüzyıl :))

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shahrazad26

Yes, I actually think they went overboard with that term in the MY and MYZ dizis, but recently I have heard it on Kara Sevda.

Speaking of which, can you tell me what kara sevda means? It seems it should be black love, but I've heard it translated in about five different ways.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shahrazad26

Yeah, my Turkish ear is still very weak, so I may have assumed they said kızcığım by extrapolating from anneciğim, which I have heard much more often. I usually have to play the scenes back a few times to get the audio right. Too bad I don't have the turtle button like I do in Duolingo :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shahrazad26

Thank you so much. So I could call the baby bebekcik or bebekciğim?

Spanish has a similar suffix: ito / cito for male nouns, ita / cita for female. They are diminutives and when used with people they also show affection. When there is clearly no affection it will be taken as condescending, though, the same as you both explained about the Turkish cik.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mkarabiy

Yes you could. You could also say bebecik or bebeciğim as you said below how you were calling your grandson.

Once I called someone cholito without knowing what that meant :) That is how I remember -ito is -cik in spanish. Also from cielito lindo song.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shahrazad26

Cholito could be used with affection but I wouldn't use it with someone I don't know or barely know. In what country were you? I don't think it is a universal Spanish word.

Spanish also uses -ito / -cito a lot on names to mean junior. My brother is a junior and at 54 we still call him Abrahamcito, in part because my father is still alive and we have to tell them apart. Does it work like that in Turkish?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarcinM85
MarcinM85
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That's interesting. I know that in Persian جان (jaan) is often used in the way you describe. So maybe Turkish took it from Persian. But I don't know for sure.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Selcen_Ozturk
Selcen_Ozturk
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no this has nothing to do with jaan, which is can in Turkish

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarcinM85
MarcinM85
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Yes, I've noticed that it is quite different. The only common feauture is that it is added at the end. By the way, do you have a suffix -çe in Turkish? That suffix is used in Persian but also in Bulgarian for diminutive effect. I have wondered if it came from Persian to Bulgarian (or the other way around) through Turkish or from some pre-Indo-European language to both languages. Or maybe it came originally from Turkish to both languages?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Selcen_Ozturk
Selcen_Ozturk
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not in standard Turkish. But I know it is used in Turkish in Balkans, like "kızçe"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shahrazad26

Maybe. Rumor has it that Turkish has borrowed a lot from Farsi.

I love this feature. I now go around calling my mom annecim or mamacim, my daughter is Vanecim, my adopted grandson is bebecim, etc.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/orde90
orde90
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You can only use the ending -cIk with the inanimate objects or the words you use to address people. That's why you can't say kızcığım or kızcık because you can't just call your daughter 'daughter!'. Of course you can say 'my daughter' but it doesn't count, you should be able to use the word without possessive adjectives.

There is also another ending which has a slightly different meaning: -cağız. It is used when you feel pity for someone. It can only be used with some certain words though. For example: adamcağız, kadıncağız, çocukcağız, kızcağız...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shahrazad26

I had heard about kızcağız but not the other words.

I didn't get your explanation. How is kızıcığım different than anneciğim? In both cases you are addressing your daughter and your mother using the general noun.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/orde90
orde90
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The word 'addressing' was maybe wrong, I should have said 'calling'. So you can call your mom 'anne' therefore you can also say 'anneciğim'. But since you can't call your daughter 'kız' you can't say kızcığım.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shahrazad26

But in English we do call our daughter "daughter". And in Turkish you would call your daughter "kızım" but not "kız", doğru mu?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/orde90
orde90
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Yes that's true, I totally missed that. You can't call your daughter 'kız' in Turkish. You need to say kızım.

1 year ago
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