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  5. "Sie ist eine Politikerin, de…

"Sie ist eine Politikerin, der ich glaube."

Translation:She is a politician whom I believe.

December 11, 2016

51 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rayenough

why do you use der instead of die?

December 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Because glauben takes the dative for a person whom you believe -- so you need the dative-case feminine relative pronoun der, rather than the accusative die.

(glauben takes the accusative for a fact that you believe but the dative for a person whom you believe.)

December 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rusmir123

I'm not a native English speaker, but I think "She is a politician whom I TRUST" is a slight better translation than "She is a politician whom I BELIEVE", but I was marked wrong.

March 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElliottofRivia

I see where you're coming from, but the word is glauben, so it's believe. At least, I haven't seen glauben used as trust up to this point, so I could be wrong.

Trust and believe are related, but don't mean the same thing. You can believe someone about a single thing, but trust is more about feeling an overall impression of sincerity from someone. You may believe them because of the trust, but there are times where they may be mutually exclusive.

June 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MFairhurst

I am a native English speaker, and I agree. It sounds much better

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaShaaView

Agreed. If it has to be believe because of "glauben" then at least accept the answer "a politician that I believe IN". Which was marked wrong for me just now.

October 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

To believe someone and to believe in someone are not the same thing, at least to me.

Ich glaube an dich. “I believe in you.” = I think that you will be successful.

Ich glaube dir. “I believe you.” = I am convinced that you are telling the truth.

Duo’s sentence uses glauben with the dative, so it’s the “believe someone” meaning, not “believe in someone”.

October 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pellucidon

I wrote "She is a politician I believe" which is ambiguous at best but was marked correct.

March 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kg5rk

As a native English speaker who has travelled much of the USA, I am having trouble with the phrase" I believe" (Ich glaube) There are people in the Southern states who have a tendency to use the phrase "I do believe" as an affirmative response to a question, or statement that they agree with. So my thinking was : She is a politician, I do believe". But I guess that would have been stated as: Sie ist Politikerin, Ich glaube." This is one of the many reasons I love these Forums !

May 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chaegan21

Is the eine necessary? Usually when referring to profession no article is needed.

December 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It's necessary here, yes.

This sentence doesn't simply state her profession -- it says that she is "a politician whom you believe".

So this additional information singles her out a bit more.

December 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

<Insert obligatory joke about lying politicians here>

On a more serious note, this sounds potentially confusing. Are there cases where der can create a double meaning like nom./acc. die?

July 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/britnbutler

How would you say "She is a politician in whom I believe"?

February 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Sie ist eine Politikerin, an die ich glaube.

February 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BaconChomper

Why did der change to die? Is it not still dative after an(no movement)? Or is it accusative because eine Politikerin is fem acc in the preceding clause? I read what you said above about glauben and facts vs people.

February 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It's an jemanden glauben with accusative (because that's the expression, regardless of movement or lack thereof).

And the polician is fem nom, not fem acc, in the preceding clause -- remember, "to be" joins a subject to a predicate in the nominative case, e.g. Er ist ein guter Arzt, not Er ist *einen guten Arzt.

February 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
  • 1606

I presume this is because preposition "an" takes accusative when used to indicate direction, and the accusative form of "die" is "die".

February 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Which moves the question to "why is 'direction' relevant here if there is no movement involved with belief" :)

February 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
  • 1606

Perhaps my intuition is informed by my knowledge of Russian where "в"="in" is a two-way preposition, just like in German, and in the expression "to believe in ..." we use accusative in Russian. In general, I'd say this is where your beliefs are directed, not where they are located, so it seems fairly logical to me.

February 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SFKrystal

When the object of a preposition is a person, it's generally accusative, unless you mean a literal place. "Ich glaube an ihm" would kind of imply "I believe (while sitting) on top of him."

July 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Libor

An die...- akkusative/not nomibative as someone ve written/**der...-dativ

April 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Belgart

i don't understand something, is the sentence synonymous to "she is a politician whom I believe to"?

December 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

I don't think you can say it like that in English.

In Germany, you have etwas glauben (believe something: accusative) but jemandem glauben (believe someone: dative), but in English it's always just simply "believe something, believe someone", not "believe to someone".

December 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Belgart

thanks :)

December 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BaconChomper

You can simply say whom I believe, or whom I believe in, but you would never say believe to.

January 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JooVitorPi1

...and yet, "in whom I believe" was marked as wrong by Duolingo here. Should it be accepted?

July 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
  • 1606

Have you tried reading other comments in this thread before posting? As mizinamo already explained (just below):
"She is a politician in whom I believe"="Sie ist eine Politikerin, an die ich glaube".

July 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JooVitorPi1

Well, ok, but I was commenting on the answer above.

July 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

<Insert obligatory joke about lying politicians here>

On a more serious note, this sounds potentially confusing. Are there cases where der can create a double meaning like nom./acc. die?

July 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bighomunculus

♫ Ohhhhhh, Em-i-ly Thoooornberry! ♫

July 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/taktmann

Is der necessary?

July 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SFKrystal

Yes, in German the relative pronoun is required.

In English, we are often less strict about grammar and chop out the implied pronoun "whom" (or even use "who" for an object). We also dangle our prepositions. Being too formal can sound old-fashioned, intellectual (even snooty), or just plain odd.

German is stricter with it's rules, and it's often easier to think of the more formal structure before translating to German.

I think German grammar is easier to learn than English for this reason. A very good book is "English Grammar for Students of German"

July 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/taktmann

Is der necessary?

July 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LoganWolfe

Ist diese Satz Dativ?

August 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/djordje721678

I have put "She is a politician that I trust", and it was marked wrong... I believe "trust" in this context works better than "believe".

August 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaConn13

Why didn't duo take "anyone but Merkel for $1000, Alex"?

August 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RWang2017

Why isn't it "die ich glaube"?

January 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Huy_Ngo

Why isn't "trust" accepted?

January 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexandreS808818

"She is a politician I believe in"?

April 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No. That would be Sie ist eine Politikerin, an die ich glaube.

April 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kyihsin

The computer-generated female voice mispronounces Politikerin, I think. It says /poliˈtiːkəʁɪn/ with the stress on "ti", but shouldn't it be /poˈliːtɪkəʁɪn/ with the stress on "li"?

January 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

You're right about where the stress should be.

(Though I'd write it [poˈliːtikɐʁɪn].)

Unfortunately, we can't influence the computer voice.

January 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heygirlitsme

who should be accepted. Duolingo doesn't teach what is correct but what is actually said in conversations. For example, we never learned how to properly use the word "sei" or "jene". We gloss over these terms because they are obsolete or used in rare cares in speech in modern German. Similarly, we as English speakers almost never use the word whom.

July 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteffieSproat

The use of whom in this context is archaic and obselete in English. Being a bit old fashioned, I do still use the word "whom", but in modern English you'd say "who" instead.

March 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
  • 1606

It's neither archaic nor obsolete - it's merely formal:
http://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/question-words/who-whom
I'd certainly prefer seeing whom in writing, lest I am to get an unflattering first impression of the writer's education.

March 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/britnbutler

Correct me if I'm wrong, but "She is a politician whom I believe" means you believe in her. "She is a politician who I believe" means you believe something she said. So it actually changes the meaning.

March 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

I think you're wrong -- there's a distinction, I think, between "believing someone" (= giving credence to something they said) and "believing in someone" (= having faith in their ability to do something), but the "in" is the important part here, not the pronoun.

I'd separate them as "She is a politician in whom I believe" versus "She is a politician whom I believe".

Or if you don't use "whom", you might not believe the old "rule" about ending a sentence in a preposition either and then you might have "She is a politician who I believe in" versus "She is a politician who I believe"

March 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/britnbutler

Whom typically comes after a preposition, so isn't the "in" implied here?

Edit: Nevermind - I just looked it up and I was wrong.

March 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Not to my mind -- whom can also stand without a preposition when it asks for the object of a verb, just like "him" can stand after a preposition as in "in him, to him, for him, about him" but also by itself as in "I saw him".

Thus also "Whom did you see?" where "Whom?" does not stand for "to whom" or "in whom" or anything like that -- just as "I saw him" does not stand for "I saw to him/in him/about him/...".

March 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
  • 1606

Yes, you are wrong. You can use "whom" both with and without prepositions. Specifically, you can say both "She is a politician in whom I believe" and "She is a politician whom I believe".
If you follow the dictionary link I gave you would find an example "She gave birth in 1970 to a boy whom she named Caleb James."

April 1, 2017
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