https://www.duolingo.com/Mundusfr

My purpose is to speak English

Hello everybody, I am French. I have chosen the tree of units in French to learn English, not French (lol) ! Indeed, I have already finished the entirety of tree of units in English yesterday.

It is funny to do these exercises. (Lol) The french pronunciation with the s at the word like "plus" and so on...

Otherwise, I learn more new english words in this tree. That is my purpose. Otherwise, to improve my english level, I watch tv in English such as France 24 in English, BBC News, the New York Times and so on.

In short, all the ways are good...

February 23, 2014

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Seth_H

Wow! I've heard of English speakers doing the reverse trees of their chosen language, but I don't usually hear about speakers of other languages doing the same (unless they are already fluent in English and are just trying to help out people trying to learn their native language). Just curious, how much English did you know before you started Duolingo? Anyway, that's awesome! Good luck with your language learning!

February 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Mundusfr

I had learned English until the university in France. And in my job, I use technical English when I do the research on the net, for instance. I manage better in writing and reading english than speaking. At my office, some meetings are made in English, and it is hard for me to understand 100% of the meeting (lol). That is why I am here...

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/KathrynRizzo

That's amazing! Your English is incredible. I'm learning French right now and I love it but I really struggle with the way sentences are put together. Sometimes I feel like I'm doing a jigsaw puzzle. The unfortunate part of being an American is that in most areas of the country, you don't learn any type of foreign language in school until middle school or sometimes high school. I started learning French in 7th grade, but you just don't learn languages in the same way that you can when you're a child. For example, from watching Sesame Street, which had a little bit of Spanish in it, I can count to ten in Spanish without even thinking about it. (I know, not super impressive.) The point is, even though I have been learning French for MUCH longer, I have to actively think about it before I speak, because I learned it so much later. I also find that it's much easier to read than to listen to and understand French. It's too fast for me!

Fun fact about American English vs. British English: Did you know that the British used to sound quite a bit like Americans do now? They changed their own accents on purpose. This started when the poor classes of English citizens got wealthy and wanted to distinguish themselves from the poor. I think it's so interesting. Here's an article about it: http://www.livescience.com/33652-americans-brits-accents.html

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Mundusfr

It is the same for me ! It is easier for me to read and write than to listen to someone speak English ! Once again, that's why I am amoung you here. (Lol)

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/FrenchCrazy

Salut !

It's a shame you completed the English for French speakers tree and it doesn't show up on your profile (they need to fix that). Anyways, I'm curious:

Why are you learning English? Do you prefer American English or British English? I love hearing why L2 speakers prefer one over the other. Have any plans to visit an English speaking area anytime soon?

Good luck with your language studies!

February 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/saschambaer

As a native German speaker:

In school we learn British English, as it is common in Europe. Since all I knew about English was American, I always found it sounded weird. Old-timey or so, idk. American English just sounded "cooler" to my 12-year old ears, and I made my teachers mad by trying to pronounce everything the american way. This was five years ago.

Now, being fluent but still going to classes I actually prefer British English. I stopped liking the oh-so-modern sound of American English and came to appreciate British — especially Welsh — accents by watching Doctor Who and Torchwood. My spoken English could be called "Global English". It's neither particularly british nor american and this is also reflected in my spelling, which neither agrees with one nor the other: I spell "grey" but "meter" or "color".

I am now trying to shift my spelling towards British, as my school grades (or rather, my English teacher) don't like Americanisms. Same with the speaking, although that is a lot harder.

I may add that the majority of my English pratise came by making friends online. My closest friends are an American, an Australian and a Dutch, all of whom I speak English to.

February 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/chilvence

Hmm. It's really sad if your teachers are grading you down just for using Americanisms. It doesn't help anyone in general to try and pretend American English doesn't exist. It's a sort of pointless act of denial. Are they British themselves? If they are, tell them from me, one Brit to another, "Wake up and smell the coffee!". I'm sure that will go down well :)

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/saschambaer

My English teacher is native Croatian but she studied English in Oxford. And they don't really grade me down because of American English, but because I'm inconsistent. Plus we will have to do the First and Advanced Exams during our school year, which are standardized proficiency tests in BE, so it only makes sense they try to keep us "pure". We have two native Americans (as in, native to america, not indios) in my class, they're excused but unlike me they also use the language consistently.

Also, that idiom is unknown to me. Explain?

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/chilvence

It's sort of like saying "Join us in the real world", but not quite as blunt, heh.

Anyway, I don't mean to be sarcastic or anything, it's just that I jumped back and forth between American and British schools all my life, and apart from having a superficial understanding of the different words and spellings, I can't really differentiate in my head where one ends and the other begins. If I can't do this myself, how can you or anyone else for that matter be expected to do better?

The thing is, I find the push pull between American and British English tragically comical. It's like watching two pensioners fight over a seat on the bus, it would be hilarious if it wasn't sad to watch. I think people sometimes need to be reminded how completely rubbish the likes of Chaucer and Shakespeare were at consistent spelling, so that they can consider the possibility that it might just not be the most important thing in the world to have petty squabbles about.

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/saschambaer

I agree with thee, but my teacher doth not.

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/chilvence

Nicely put my friend, nicely put ;)

I would share my opinion with your teachers if you get the opportunity though. If you can do it without ruffling feathers that is. Examiners might be sticklers for detail, but people you meet in the real world... less so. "Good English" is just a label that can be applied to any English that is easy to understand. Music, Television and the Internet have all been massive factors in blasting away the barriers between English dialects in the last 100 years anyway, and good riddance to them, now we can get on with our lives. We haven't lost anything at all, we can still talk the way we choose to, but we've gained the ability to understand one another better. We should be worrying about how shockingly bad we are at foreign languages instead of nitpicking the inconsequential differences in our own, especially considering that no one really cares except ourselves.

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/mhtardis21

I love Doctor Who!

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/GrgoCroatia

Haha, same with me, same story everything! (and almost the same with nationalities you enlisted at the end)

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Grokford

The accent that you are describing is called a trans-Atlantic accent it is usually as a result of Americans spending time in Britain or vice versa. This was quite common during the World Wars.

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/FrenchCrazy

Cool! Thanks for sharing! I really like the British English accent but thats probably because I have an American accent (so I just like what's different). I heard of some Brits who said they liked our accent and were kind of jealous, but I think most of them prefer their British one.

My girlfriend is learning English as a 2nd language, she's from Italy, and she really likes American English. Different strokes for different folks :P

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Samy1979

Haha. I also love the British way of speaking ;-)

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Mundusfr

Yes, I don't understand why the English for French tree doesn't appear here ! Otherwise, I have 11 as the level for that tree.

Personally, I prefer British English, because I feel I understand better when they talk !(lol)

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/curlyeric

I finished the English->french tree and started on the reverse tree like you. 30 days for the English tree is quite fast, did you have previous experience? It is interesting in doing the reverse tree the difference in sentence choices and words are interesting.

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Mundusfr

As I have answered to set_H I am not a beginner !(lol) I have begun the tree French to English yesterday. As I have some experience from the other, and as I had more time at this sunday (lol), I have reached the 6 level. I would like to finish it quickly to have more time to do every thing else, such as translating articles in Immersion for instance.

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrealphus

Do you have an account on Skype? I was hoping to find somebody to practice pronunciation with and I could do the same for you. As long as you don't mind picking up a bit of an American accent on it ;)

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Mundusfr

Not for the moment, but it will come !(lol)

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Lawtey

Looks like you're doing good!

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Mundusfr

I hope that you all understand me. There are a lot of messages that I have to answer, so I don't have time to verify with Google traduction(lol) all what I have written.

I thank you all to spend your time to reply to my message. If there are mistakes, certainly, don't hesitate to correct me...

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/lpybus

Bon courage ! Peut-être je vais faire la même chose quand je terminerai mes competences françaises ici.

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Mundusfr

Oui, c'est très intéressant ! Parfois, on fait des erreus dans sa propre langue. C'est rageant !(lol) On croyait la maîtriser et pourtant on fait des erreurs mais alors vraiment bêtes ! Et duolingo ne pardonne pas !!! (lol)

February 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/chocolatemilkluv

i am trying to learn italian because i want to go there.

January 6, 2017
Learn French in just 5 minutes a day. For free.