"Mi amigo paga los domingos."

Translation:My friend pays on Sundays.

5 years ago

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mattmoran

Is this a euphemism for "My friend is hung over on Sundays."?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BlackHeart01
BlackHeart01
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i don't think so, being a native spanish speaker, i need more context to understand this sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sverrba
Sverrba
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why is "my friend pays Sundays" a correct translation? sure it's an okay literal translation, but noone using proper English would actually say/write that. And if they did someone would/should point out that it's wrong

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BMC
BMC
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Exactly. It's not really natural English.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KolilaKoa

I thought 'los" was a plural the...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hellomusiclove

agreed

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdorlon

It is. You always need 'the' before days of the week in Spanish, but in English we don't say that. So a more literal translation is "my friend pays Sundays". I think in English if someone said to you "he paid Sunday", you would know that meant "he paid on Sunday". It's the same thing here.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samrickim

Yes, but for some reason it sounds more natural to most English speakers to use the past tense of "pay" without an article instead of the present tense of "pay" with the article. Since this is only using the present tense of pay, it would make sense to only have the one article be the correct answer.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Naypam
Naypam
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The translation is plural. It's Sundays, not Sunday. If it was "My friend pays this Sunday (singular)" it would be "Mi amigo pago este domingo".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JasotheMayo

I wrote "My friend pays the Sundays."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nomadicwahoo

Me too! I didn't realize that los could mean on. How are we supposed to know if it means on or the?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sys
sys
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For days of the week, phrases like "los Domingos" mean "ON sundays". Similarly, "comemos los viernes" would translate to we eat on Fridays.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robertmjones

Awe shucks , I put " My friend pay on Sundays" and lost my last heart when I was almost done (:-((.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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"pays"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KatherineH05

Hahaha, me too. I was pretty upset.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HaileyL91

Ya, "My friend pays on sundays" works though.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nerimera

I put: on sundays my friend pays. the programme recognizes misspellings etc but this is shown as a wrong answer?!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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This would be really unnatural to say it in this word order in English, but technically it works.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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That would be ‘Los domingos paga mi amigo.’ It's a difference of old and new information, or ‘topic’ and ‘focus’. “My friend pays on Sundays.” answers the question “When does your friend pay?”, while “On Sundays my friend pays.” answers the question “Who pays on Sundays.”.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/srocknowski

when did we learn days of the week? i mean.. i kinda know them from outside of duolingo buuttttttt when did we learn them here?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/usa63woods

Sunday is the only day of the week provided thus far

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdorlon

I really like duolingo but sometimes you will have to go to other websites to fill in the gaps

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thrillwaters
Thrillwaters
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You can always mouse over the words to get the meaning.

But this sentence really bugs me, don't quite understand it haha. Twice now I've put "my friend pays for sundays" oops. I've been doing literal translations up until now and they seem to work.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Yes, this is where we stop translating word for word and translate one language's expression for another.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LazCon
LazCon
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Review the Time category just before the second "checkpoint". We learned Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday (lunes, martes y miercoles) in Time - lesson 1.
Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday (jueves, viernes, sabado, y domingo) were in Time - lesson 2

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/forkid

my friend pays on sundays what does this sentense mean?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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My friend and I take turns paying (say for lunch). On Sundays, it's always my friend's turn to pay.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bobbi36

It is probably not a common sentence, but it is not incorrect. We have to think about context sometimes. Maybe "My friend and I go out for lunch on Sundays and Tuesdays. My friend pays on Sundays."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andrewdahliscool

Does pagar also mean "to pay on"? I see the "to pay (for)" definition, but not this one. Is this something specific to the context?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fizzlewicket
Fizzlewicket
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It just means "to pay".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andrewdahliscool

Ok. Where does the 'on' come from?

Edit: This http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/days.htm says that that's the case for any article +day of week.

Does this carry over to anything else you might have an on-based action? Like "Pago el tiempo" == "Pay on time"? Or "Saltamos la cama" == "We jump on bed" ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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Using the preposition “on” with days of the week is just a peculiarity of English. It has nothing to do with the article ‘los’ or anything else in Spanish. English never uses the preposition “on” for other units of time, such as hours, weeks, months, or years. And it's often optional in English anyway: You can say either “See you Sunday.” or “See you on Sunday”; and either “Sundays I visit my grandparents.” or “On Sundays I visit my grandparents.”.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andrewdahliscool

Then the translation of the phrase is accommodating English, you're saying?

How does that relate to what a native spanish speaker means when they say something like this? Is there a relationship between the action and the day that is saying 'this action takes place today'? Is the preposition implied?

Or why is "en domingos" wrong?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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‘en domingos’ is unidiomatic Spanish for two reasons: (1) because the preposition ‘en’ shouldn't be there; (2) because the article ‘los’ should be there.

(1) The preposition ‘en’ just isn't used for days of the week in Spanish — although it is used for parts of the day, as in ‘en la tarde|noche|madrugada’ = “in the {afternoon|night|early morning}”; for days of the month, as in ‘en el 21 de junio’ = “on the 21st of June”; for months, as in ‘en marzo’ = “in March”; and for years, as in ‘en 2014’ = “in 2014”.

(2) When referring to things in general of any category, whether it's ‘los domingos’ = “Sundays”, ‘los amigos’ = “friends”, or ‘los pagos’ = “payments”, there's no definitive philosophical justification as to whether or not to include a definite article. Spanish does; English doesn't (except for proper nouns).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/atntony
atntony
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SHOULD IT BE : mi amigo pago "en" los domingos?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LazCon
LazCon
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No. When referring to days of the week, los is always included BUT translates more closely to "on" rather than "the". "Los domingos" = "On Sundays" or just "Sundays" rather than the literal translation of "The Sundays." "Los viernes" = "On Fridays" or "Fridays." So "Vamos al cine los viernes y los domingos. Pago los viernes y mi amiga paga los sabados." would loosely translate to "We go to the movies on Fridays and Sundays. I pay on Fridays and my friend pays on Sundays."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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See the replies to andrewdahliscool's question.

4 years ago
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