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"Vamos a nadar a mi casa."

Translation:We are going to swim at my house.

5 years ago

141 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Lanturnn
Lanturnn
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Let's swim to my house doesn't work?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aliNka

I wrote 'Let's swim to my house' too. Marked wrong. Should be ok, shouldn't it?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HolyT
HolyT
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Yes, it should be OK, and it is now (Jan. 2015).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonnyhewer

Well I was marked wrong with this answer Dec. 2015.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth750482

I was just marked wrong, too, July 2016.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AldoPalumbo
AldoPalumbo
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Maybe they know where you live, and they don't see how it's possible.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/splittongue
splittongue
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Haha, Aldo, best read on Duo today, have a lingot!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anita98586
Anita98586
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agreed... still wrong May 2018

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anita98586
Anita98586
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Enrique Iglesias tells a story (I like to listen to his Spanish interviews for practice) about a fan who DID swim TO his house from some bridge somewhere... LOL

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathchoo

"You take our car to work, I'll take my board. And when you're out of fuel. I'm still afloat" - Wheezer

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Max_Thruster

no.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AldoPalumbo
AldoPalumbo
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It's littorally correct.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emilybronte13

Intended humor?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AldoPalumbo
AldoPalumbo
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At last! You're laugh-miaowing, aren't you?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emilybronte13

I should have added: "Swimmingly!"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AldoPalumbo
AldoPalumbo
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That's amazing. Are you among those magnificent cats?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emilybronte13

I am a crazy cat woman (thus the cat icon, of my now-deceased 23 year old kitty), but I have no swimming cats. Maybe someday...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AldoPalumbo
AldoPalumbo
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23 years suggests a very relaxed cat indeed.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AldoPalumbo
AldoPalumbo
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Nice. But can cats swim?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emilybronte13

Indeed, I am! Thank you!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AldoPalumbo
AldoPalumbo
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Marvellous :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

yes. that should be correct

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OsoGegenHest
OsoGegenHest
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No, it shouldn't!

That's not how you use verbs of movement in Spanish.

  • "He ran out" = Salió corriendo (the expected corrió fuera only means he was outside and did some running).
  • "I drove to work" = Fui al trabajo en coche (the expected conduje al trabajo only means you conducted someone there).
  • "We flew to Valencia" = Fuimos a Valencia en avión (the expected volamos a Valencia is slightly odd).
  • "You limped into the hospital" = Entraste en el hospital cojeando (the expected cojeaste en el hospital only means you were in the hospital and limped about).
  • "She shuffled away" = Se marchó arrastrando los pies (The expected arrastró los pies fuera means she was outside and did some shuffling).
  • "They walked into the room" = Entraron en el cuarto [a pie] (the expected caminaron en el cuarto only means they were in the room and walked about).
  • "Let's swim to your place" = Vamos a tu casa nadando (the expected vamos a nadar a tu casa only means that I want to go to your place in order to swim).
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ekihoo
ekihoo
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I wonder. The name of this session is FUTURE. At least I expect examples of common use of future ('shall, will, going to)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OsoGegenHest
OsoGegenHest
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The thing is that Vamos a... can equally convey "Let's..." and "We're going to...". The latter expresses a future.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RSvanKeure
RSvanKeure
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The session name is deceptive. Ordinary future is with suffixes on the infinitive. This session is "Future with Ir" and should be marked that way.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Thank you for this!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Very interesting and helpful. It now makes me wonder if Duo would (incorrectly) use the word-for-word translations of these sentences.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/splittongue
splittongue
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"(the expected volamos a Valencia is slightly odd)" - not if you are Jonathan Livingston :P

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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Thank you for these examples, OsoGengenHest. I am giving you a lingot for your time. It really helped me to understand this sentence.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Toad111762

It does if you live in Houston

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

Lanturnn no, you should say : let's go swim to my house. If you say : let's swim, it would be in Spanish : Nadamos Imperative

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lanturnn
Lanturnn
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I think thats wrong, I'm not 100% sure but I am a native speaker and the Dominican Republic dialect wouldn't be so far off to be incorrect about such a thing as this. - The imperative of Nadar - Nadamos is simply for "We swim" -

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

Sorry, I had a distraction, I meant, nademos es imperative

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

"Nademos" and "vamos a nadar" both can mean "Let's swim"

no difference

However, "Vamos a nadar" can also mean "We are going to swim"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TimFuller

I wrote, "We are going to swim to my house" and I realized too late that it sounded ridiculous — but it was accepted. Don't ask me to explain why.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HolyT
HolyT
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If you live on a canal or lake or other body of water that connects houses, this makes perfect sense. My brother used to live at such a place and people could use the water for recreation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ej09e

Or if you are a beaver

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/machtibor

If you live in Venice, you can use that phrase every day :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael307373

Creo que esto es ilegal.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteveSteml

I wrote the exact same thing and it was not accepted (5/10/17). I live near a lake with a lot houses on it. I could easily imagine swimming to houses from the beach.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Izaler
Izaler
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8/30/17 and it's still not accepted. I know it sounds sort of silly but it's not so implausible that I think it shouldn't be allowed. Maybe they just want to make sure we understand that "a" can mean "at" in some cases? On the flip side, though, they marked me as wrong and corrected it to "We're going to swim IN my house," which in my opinion sounds even more ridiculous.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/calmelbourne

Why is it 'at my house', rather than 'to my house'? It says 'to my house' is also correct, but wouldn't 'at my house' be 'en mi casa'? If it can indeed mean both, how would a Spanish speaker specify which one they mean?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tanataviele

I suppose it's because 'en mi casa' would also mean 'in my house'. That is, inside it. Which of course could be, if you have an indoor pool. But... well, it does sound a bit weird. Maybe a native speaker can clarify whether I'm right or wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nannaibear

I think go swim is an american format, I would never say that as a british english speaker I would say go and swim or go swimming or even go to swim.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom873317
Tom873317
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Oddly, "go to swim" is the only one of those that sounds off to me in the US. I wonder what they say in other English-speaking countries.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lafe55
lafe55
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It is not odd that "go to swim" sounds off. It sounds off to every English speaker in the US. "Go swimming," "go to my house to swim," and "go swim at my house" all sound natural to US English speakers. "Go to swim" is not said in the US by any native English speakers. And yes, we are indeed native English speakers.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timplum
timplum
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To me (a Brit) although I would agree "Go swimming" (or "go for a swim") seems the most natural, I would not think anything was wrong if someone said, "Go to swim," and would maybe use the phrase myself. It is "Go swim" that sounds unnatural to us!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Max_Thruster

Oddly, I think they would say 'go back to school'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaered
chaered
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(recap from below): "I must go seek some dew-drops here." (Shakespeare, a (less recent) native speaker)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Max_Thruster

Yes Shakespeare is a true yardstick for modern grammar...

'Harbour more craft and more corrupter ends Than twenty silly-ducking observants'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaered
chaered
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I can dredge up more recent ones. The point of referring to Shakespeare is that it would be hard to dismiss him and insist that he is/was: (1) not a native British English speaker, or (2) not really good at writing English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DelVallePedro

American English and Elizabethan English are closer than British English and Elizabethan English. Shakespeare's accent would sound more American than that of a modern Briton. Reason being that in Great Britain there was a divide between the classes. The upperclassmen or posh folk began to drop the Rs here and there and develop colloquialisms that would distinguish them from anyone beneath. This English became publically adopted through technology like the radio and television broadcasting, and became the standard British English of today. The first Americans left GB before in the middle of this class divide. They were the Puritans and Catholics, lower class and often persecuted groups in England. That is the English that American English is based on and the English that Shakespeare used. That's why Shakespeare is often times acted out with American accents. We do, although, need to remember that Elizabethan English was a flexible time for English. Rules were less regulated, and the more quirkier the more poetically distinguished.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Max_Thruster

that's just toss.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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An American would really say, "let's go swimming at my house."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

And an English person would reply 'Blimey! You've got a swimming pool!'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeredithNa
MeredithNa
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And an Aussie would just say: "Crikey! Let's go swimming before the sun melts our skin off... maybe at 5am?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Semtater
Semtater
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That's what you say in Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, and So. California. You're weird if you don't have a swimming pool.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HolyT
HolyT
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It's still too cold for most of the year to use a swimming pool in most of Southern California. You can use it comfortably for a few months but you have to maintain it for 12 months. It is absolutely NOT true that you are considered weird if you don't have a pool here. I consider it a wise use of space and money NOT to have a pool, and the large majority of houses do not have them.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Semtater
Semtater
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Alright, you got me on the So. Cal. I don't go there very often. But I do have family in Phoenix/Mesa area, so I know that having a pool there is quite common.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaered
chaered
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You either get a swimming pool or a jelly of the month club membership. It depends on the Xmas bonus.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom873317
Tom873317
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Or a friendly visit from the local swat team.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lesorton

So what is wrong with "We will swim in my house"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth0

I think the reason "We will swim in my house." is not accepted is because of the 'in'. "We will/are going to swim at my house" is probably correct (I didn't have the translate to English one for this sentence so didn't get to try it), but because of the 'a', 'in' would be wrong as it would need to have 'en' instead.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Max_Thruster

It would imply that your house is in a flood zone and has had a bad turn of luck.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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Or maybe that you live in a huge home that has a pool inside.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

I think that vamos=let's go (present) but we will, is future tense, that is not the same.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

I think some people don't learn verb tenses enough here, so that's why they put down votes. we will is future, not imp;erative, not present tense

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

Future and imperative are not the same.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

You are correct, but what does that have to do with this sentence?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stigg426

Can "en mi casa" and "a mi casa" mean the same thing? "en" can mean "at" in certain contexts

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

No Stigg, en mi casa would mean in my house but a mi casa, is a movement, you have to use "A". EX : Vamos a Paris but ellos viven en paris.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephenTkacs

I disagree. Frequently, "en" means "at" for locations. There are countless examples of this in duolingo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

of course you won't swim IN your house unless you have an interior pool

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gigiwilson

how would one say ¨let us swim to my house´

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

gigi- nademos a mi casa

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nueby
nueby
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Or vamos a nadar a mi casa, good point. Duo does not use this form of the first-person plural imperative much. I hope to find this sentence in the reverse tree discussions.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lafe55
lafe55
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What is a reverse tree discussion?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nueby
nueby
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3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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Gigiwilson, according to OsoGegenHest's post in this discussion, you would say "Vamos a mi casa nadando." I don't guess there are any native Spanish speakers in this discussion to verify that he/she is right, but at least this sentence is not ambiguous.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ullek
ullek
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I also wonder...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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...... said Chip the beaver to his friends. ("we are going to swim to my house" is accepted as correct.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stevon.mcc

I said lets swim at my house

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Naylor1993
Naylor1993
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¿Por qué es 'a mi casa' en vez de 'en mi casa'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

naylor- because en mi casa would imply that you would swin inside the house

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/normroosjr

How do I know if "vamos a" is "let us go" or "we are going"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

normroosjr- vamos a is we go to - vayamos is let's go to- estamos yendo is we are going

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RSvanKeure
RSvanKeure
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"Let's go" is formally "vayamos", but "vamos" is often used colloquially.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DEAZTURUEN
DEAZTURUEN
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A common issue for Venice.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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Or for Tampa, Florida, or other lakes that have homes on the waterfront. Rare, but plausible.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel.Luke

Vamos a nado a mi casa should also be accepted. It means We go swimming to my house.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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No, one cannot correctly say "vamos a nado a mi casa" because that would be literally "We are going to I swim to/at my house. You have to use "Vamos" in this exercise to indicate the future, (We are going) + "a" (to) + nadar (swim = infinitive of the verb that indicates what you are doing in the future).

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TranMinhNhut
TranMinhNhut
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Go swimming is correct. Go swim is not so

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/omgpenny

Not acceptable in Britain. Would have to be ¨¨let us go to swim´´

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/omgpenny

This translation would not be considered correct English in Britain. It should be "Let us go to swim " or "Let us go swimming"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/omgpenny

In Britain we would not say "Let us go swim" , but " Let us go swimming" or "Let us go to swim at my house", in the latter the "to" implying " in order to"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beeohdee

Why is this, "Let's go swimming", accepted? My answer was accepted, which was "We are going to swim to my house." But I would have thought that "Let's go swimming would use the subjunctive, "vayamos a nadar". Any help here?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/prasant
prasant
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My reply should be accepted The suggested answer is not fully accurate

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Faith-Ange1
Faith-Ange1
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I wrote, "We are going to swim at my home." and it did not take it

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AngelaOddie

Your translation is not grammatical

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gz7g6b

Duoingo clearly takes more liberties translating to English

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobInco1

We are going to swim in my house should be accepted. My friend has a pool in his house so we swim in his house. It is even in the DL drop down translation

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/logotha
logotha
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'Go swim' is very american,in uk we would just say lets go to my house to swim but it wont accept 'let us swim at my house 'which is the nearest option available

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConnieHayd

I don't agree that "go swim" is very American. I have never heard it stated that way in the Midwest, nor have I heard it said by other Americans. Everyone I've heard has stated it as, "let's go swimming!"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JimZTango
JimZTango
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I believe "Vamos a nadar A mi casa." would be "Let us swim TO my house." "Let us go swim "AT" my house." would be "Vamos a nadar EN mi casa."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LizStace

That is not gramatical English

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aterix

Why isn't "We are going to swim to my house" correct?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salsabandito

why not "to my house"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HiroTime

Wait does anybody hear the snap a?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stocker65

I wrote "we are going to swim to my house". I would have thought this was technically correct but was marked wrong.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/88MB202z

Why is it "let us" instead of "we are going to"?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jim40

why not en mi casa?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joe814027

Let's go swim at my house

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GDSexton01

"Let us go swim" is not correct English. It should be either 'go swimming' or 'go to swim'.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ste6601
ste6601
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Shall we go and swim at my house?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/James30032

I thought this was "we go to swim at my house." Where does "let's" come in?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1sLpibFl

'Let's go to swim at my house' should be OK. Certainly in UK English.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clari64

I preferred to put, 'We are going to swim at my house' and it was marked correct. If I'm right the, 'Let us go swim at my house' is using the imperative. 'LET US...' sounds a bit odd. I think that 'LETS go swim at my house' sounds better. In the UK we would tend to say, 'Lets go AND swim at my house', which I think sounds just fine.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ste6601
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"Let us go and swim at my house" was marked incorrect. I cannot think when we would ever say this in the UK. We always go and do something. We do not "Go walk", we "Go and walk", or "Go for a walk", etc.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jacob946088

Let us go swim at my house? Uhh seems like a weak translation!? (2018)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moolyboo

let us go swim at my house, some strange way is the correct answer

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RudyGasparelli

I think that "Let's go swimming at my house" requires the imperative "Vayamos"

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RudyGasparelli

How about "We go swimming at my house."?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

I don't think that quite works. To me, "we go swimming" = "we swim" is present tense. That's different from the Spanish vamos a nadar, which is a standard construction for the English "going to" future.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chelby_

Why doesn't nadar need to be conjugated after vamos? Do you only need to conjugate once?

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

It's part of a verb phrase. Even the English phrase "are going to swim" uses the infinitive for swim. So, the Spanish actually matches the English. Quite often verb phrases make use of an infinitive, but that's not always the case. Thus, you sometimes "only need to conjugate once" and sometimes need to conjugate multiple verbs. It all depends on what you want to say.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/upfielder
upfielder
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How are the correct solutions: "We go swim in my house" and "Let us go swim at my house" correct? These are rubbish.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mawileboy
mawileboy
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What would you say? The first thing I would say would be "let's go swim at my house"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

Let's go and swim at my house

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Max_Thruster

I guess you are not a native English speaker as, in English, you need 'to' before 'swim' as you are using the infinitive.

e.g 'Mrs Smith asked us to call in on our way home.' NOT 'Mrs Smith asked us call in on our way home.'

or e.g. 'Did you remember to post the letter to your mother?' NOT 'Did you remember post the letter to your mother?'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Max_Thruster

go TO swim!!!! not go swim!! who wrote this, an infant?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaered
chaered
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"go swim" sounds right to me

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RSvanKeure
RSvanKeure
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"Go swim" is fine in English. Or "go swimming".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Max_Thruster

Really? So when I would say, for example, 'We came here to work, not to play.' you would say, 'We came here work, not play.'? Still sound right?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaered
chaered
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Different construction and relation between the verbs. In "Let's go swim", you can insert "and": Let's go and swim"; they function as serial verbs. In "We came here to work", the "to" expresses a purpose, plus there is an intervening word "here", which breaks the serial verb pattern. It is interesting to see the parallel with Mandarin, where you can tack 来/去 (come/go) after a verb to show the direction of the action.

"I must go seek some dew-drops here." (Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night’s Dream)

3 years ago