"Aus einem Ei"

Translation:From an egg

February 15, 2013

120 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/psycotti

WHAT'S THAT SUPPOSED TO MEAN??

January 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bob20020

It is where Duo was born.

April 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malsitibou

I guess they want say that "Dativ always come after (Aus) "

April 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/barbs422494

is this true? i cant see any other reason why... thanks for the help

June 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

aus always requires the dative case, yes.

June 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SydneyBlak4

Just wondering why - there is movement from the eggs inside to the outside which should require accusative. I asked my 94 year old German born neighbor this question an her answer was "just because". Seems to be a very good answer for many things in German!

January 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

there is movement [...] which should require accusative.

Movement, in and of itself, doesn't require any particular case.

There are some prepositions that can take either the dative or the accusative case -- and with those prepositions, the accusative case is used when the preposition indicates the destination of movement.

But there are prepositions that always imply movement, and so there's no need for any particular case to distinguish the movement meaning from a location meaning.

These include von "from, away from", aus "from out of", and zu "to", which all happen to take the dative case, as well as durch "through", which happens to take the accusative case.

January 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fazel440395

It doesn't mean anything! It is supposed to say that if a noun comes after prepositions like aus and whatever, that noun comes as Dative. So calm down. Inhale and exhale!

August 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElibeyElili

it is dative case preposition. "aus"

August 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilcattivo001

What is the difference between Von and Aus?

February 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rufiruti

'aus' to state that it comes out of something. It must have been inside. 'Von' could be explained as coming from a point. ∙→

August 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash473779

So 'aus' like 'out', 'von' like 'from' maybe these are all cognates?

May 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rufiruti

Yes

July 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mariam.m.s.e

But we say: ich komme aus England, which means "from" and that is a geographical/physical point, there is not inside there, right?

October 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rufiruti

True, but better take it as an image and not literally. If you come from a country you have been inside and you have to get out of it Ͼ→ (aus). “Ich komme aus England,” would mean for example that you live / or make vacation inside of the country and now you get out of it, even though the translation says “from”. On the other hand |→ “Ich komme von England,” would probably see the place as on a map. As I have been writing you can see “aus” like this Ͼ→ (out of) and “von” like this |→ (from a point).

October 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

The way the Germans think of it is that you were there and you came out of it. It is very similar to the egg situation if you think about it as you were in(side) England and you came out of it but both can be translated as "from" in English.

December 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

Sort of. Be wary of prepositions, they're very arbitrary from language to language. All of a sudden, something you think means "for" is being used like "to".

IMO that's because a lot of the relationships they describe are actually metaphoric.

June 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iheoma

Wow! Makes sense now

July 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JettyTheYeti

It could also mean of or from if used in a name. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Von

October 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Das15

Why are we using the dative case here?

November 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mebanite

I am surprised no one mentioned the mnemonic song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bw1O_Z9Wo-8

May 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eleonoraonline

Maybe because it is not particularly helpful?

July 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amelia2306

I do not understand why it is dative? If the egg is the indirect object, then what is the subject and object. Presuming this is a response to 'Where did Duo come from?' Would Duo be the subject? Then what is the object?

November 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/northernguy

MillieMoo22

Some prepositions always signal the case of the following noun.

Aus introduces the dative case. As does außer, bei, gegenüber, mit, nach and some others.

Für, bis, ohne, durch and others introduce the accusative case.

So....you know that the article will be dative because aus tells you it has to be. Wherever this phrase was lifted from, it would be written in the dative. The presence of aus tells you all you need to know about that sentence to determine what case it should be in. If it wasn't grammatically correct to place the egg in the dative case in that sentence, then aus would not be the preposition introducing it.

I assume that the point of this Duo example is for you to come away with the idea that ...aus = dative. Aus = dem, der, dem, den/ einem, einer, einem, einen...masculine, feminine, neuter, plural form.

If you learn the prepositions that always take a particular case then you don't have to trouble yourself over what case a given phrase is. Those prepositions, if they are available, tell you which case much faster than you can figure it out for yourself.

Undoubtedly, there are some examples that are exceptions but you can take it as a general rule, while keeping your mind open.

December 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/northernguy

From an egg is a phrase. It does not have a subject verb object order because it is not a sentence.

January 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/philipralph84

Why is "einem" marked "a/an masc/neut nominative"? I thought those were both "ein" in nominative. Thank you!

December 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kmramna

It is because it is an un finished sentence. And prepositions are used for accusative and dative. Since this is a dative case hence einum is used and not ein.

September 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adnuzz.crezz

What is dative case ?

January 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dustyhusername

Because aus is a dative preposition, It causes Ei to take the dative indefinite article einem. Their list of dative prepositions is actually on Duolingo's explanation of Accusative Prepositions

March 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod

    Read Duolingo's explanation if you haven't already.

    January 11, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/northernguy

    The indirect object of the sentence. The object of some prepositions in phrases.

    January 11, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/manisina

    When do we use einem, einer, einen in sentences? Or in similar statements, meinem, meiner, meinen?

    March 11, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
    Mod

      There is a helpful explanation page at the beginning of the Duolingo lesson on "Dative case" if you click the lightbulb icon.

      January 9, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itsina

      Why does it have to be "from an egg"? Why not "over an egg"? It says one of the translations of aus is over.

      September 3, 2013

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrcurtis.english

      You probably would never use the sentence 'over an egg' - in this context, it's probably the answer to the question 'woher kommen Hähnchen?'

      December 22, 2013

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kmramna

      The chicken sits over an egg???

      September 13, 2014

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eirinn8

      Chickens sit 'on' eggs, not over them.

      January 10, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LearnerSojourner

      It's asking from where ___ is coming from. In this case, a bird or something of similar form since he's saying "from/out of an egg". Technically, I suppose the answer could also be a platypus. But, like derwaliser said...

      "Where do chickens come from?" (woher kommen Hähnchen) "They come from eggs" (aus einem Ei, or, Sie kommen aus einem Ei)

      June 9, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Radicrane

      The bird flew over an egg.

      May 30, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chartsman

      Exactly, and how would that be in German? I imagine no "aus" would be used.

      September 1, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

      As I understand it the translation of "aus" as "over" is not referring to the positional meaning of "over". It is used as a colloquial way of saying that something is finished e.g. "es ist aus" meaning "it is over" so it does not work here at all. http://context.reverso.net/traduction/allemand-anglais/es+ist+aus The hints are very dependent on context and do not necessarily apply in the current exercise.

      February 25, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hrothgar1488

      Because over an egg makes no sense. Aus einem Ei tells you where something came from (i.e. die Strumpfhose kam aus einem Ei). In this case you find that the pantyhose came from an egg. Were you to use over the sentence would make no sense.

      May 23, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WolfStriker1

      Not completely sure, but I think you would have to use "über" to mean over in this case.

      October 26, 2013

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/umarkhn123

      How many meanings does aus have?

      April 30, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/harthacanute

      So, would "from a house" be "aus einer/einem Haus"?

      January 21, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
      Mod

        I think so, in the sense of "coming out of a house", i.e. specifically through a doorway for example. To come "from" a house, i.e. from a house to a shop, would use von.

        And to answer your confusion about einer/einem, it is einem because aus is a 'dative preposition' (what follows it is always in dative case), and Haus is a neuter object (and the declension pattern for neuter objects in dative case is -em. There's no way for a singular neuter object to get a -er declension in any case. As an extra complication, some nouns can also change their endings in dative case - so it could also be einem Hause (but this seems to be optional this time).

        You can also be more specific about whether it is "going out from" or "coming out from" by using hinaus or heraus respectively. When talking about an egg, though, I don't think it's usual to consider the perspective of remaining inside the egg so you'd just say aus without any ambiguity.

        January 21, 2016

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/harthacanute

        Thank you- can you give me a link/list where I can find more help on dative/accusative/nominative case?

        January 21, 2016

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
        Mod

          Duolingo has lesson tips at the start of the lessons on accusative case and dative case if you use the web version (even on a phone - look for the light bulb icon). Also, practising those lessons and reading the comments you will find many tips and useful links.

          January 21, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/harthacanute

          Vielen dank!

          January 21, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fahad728700

          Why don't we use ein/eine instead of einer/einem

          May 16, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luciferiaaah

          When would I use this?

          October 8, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

          For example if some asks you, "Where do baby crocodiles come from?"

          October 8, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JSavageIII

          I guess there's an implied "It comes" at the beginning ("Das Hähnchen kommt aus einem Ei") So Dative is also used for coming from something as well as going to something?

          August 4, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

          It depends on the preposition.

          aus "from out of" requires the dative case, as does zu "to".

          Note, however, that those prepositions that can take either dative or accusative generally require the accusative when motion towards is intended, e.g. in + dative is "in" while in + accusative is "into"; similarly with auf for "on" (location) versus "onto" (destination of movement).

          August 5, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DamirMarti

          Latin Ab ovo - from the beginning

          February 3, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ayumi750381

          It means "Ab ovo"

          April 20, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/menacinghat

          why do you need the m?

          February 15, 2013

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katherle

          The preposition "aus" is always followed by the dative case. "Ei" is neuter, and the dative neuter form of "ein" is "einem".

          Cases overview: http://german.about.com/library/blcase_sum.htm

          Dative prepositions: http://german.about.com/library/blcase_dat2.htm

          February 15, 2013

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/evamaleva14

          What's the difference between einen and einem?

          October 2, 2015

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/northernguy

          einen = masculine accusative case

          einem = masculine dative case.

          December 1, 2015

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LinguisticNox

          Diffrence between Ein, Einem, Eine and Einer please....

          December 27, 2015

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
          Mod

            They mean the same thing ("a" or "an"), but the ending has to change (called inflection) because German nouns have gender which works as a kind of 'signal' that causes inflection according to grammar rules.

            There is a good introduction if you view this lesson in a web browser.

            January 9, 2016

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emegele

            Is "aus" always used with dative?

            January 25, 2016

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/northernguy

            Generally, yes. That is definitely the way that Duo is teaching it.

            January 25, 2016

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

            Yes. It's one of the prepositions that always go with the dative case.

            aus bei mit nach seit von zu are the most common prepositions with dative.

            July 27, 2017

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/barbs422494

            thank you... i want to ask you if i could invite you as a follower?

            June 7, 2018

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

            I don't follow a lot of people.

            June 7, 2018

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/barbs422494

            i guess thats a very polite way of saying i shouldnt ask you! no problem....

            June 7, 2018

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ann390834

            Every time she says "einen" it sounds like "einem", EVERY time! :P

            April 4, 2016

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
            Mod

              In this case, it is einem...

              April 8, 2016

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kemar14

              why is "from a egg wrong"

              June 25, 2016

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lexht

              Because you use "an" before words starting with vowels.

              October 5, 2016

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shimerab

              I don't know about anyone else, but I put einem in my answer and then went back to listen to it again because I thought she said einen and she did say einen, so I changed it and got it wrong. I am so tired of doing this.

              September 30, 2016

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shimerab

              Is it possible the endings are not pronounced clearly to see if we can come up with the correct word? I know when I hear it correctly I get it right, but now I'm also getting it even when they don't pronouce it so it can be understood because I know how it is used. Just a thought.

              October 1, 2016

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarioScavi

              from an egg : why is wrong?

              October 14, 2016

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aaron406544

              Why not "Aus eine Ei"?

              October 28, 2016

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dadadododo

              "Aus" requires Dativ case and Ei is neutrum (das Ei), so it becomes "Aus einem Ei"

              February 15, 2017

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/apoorvsood007

              Is Aus a dative preposition or a two-way preposition.

              January 28, 2017

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katherle

              A dative preposition.

              January 28, 2017

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dadadododo

              Are Latin phrases usually translated into German or used directly? I mean would you say "Aus einem Ei " or "Ab ovo"?

              February 15, 2017

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaufalAlav

              Der Vogel kommt aus einem Ei!

              May 11, 2017

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Felix670603

              There's is 'ein', eine', 'einen', 'einer', and 'einem'. Is there anywhere where I can find an explanation as to when to use each of these?

              July 8, 2017

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gouru

              So in German we consider the ablative case as the dative case, right?

              I mean, we use "aus" here but also put the rest of the sentence in dative.

              July 15, 2017

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rufiruti

              Dative is not ablativ: Dativ is used with certain prepositions. “Aus” is one of them. It is also used with some phrasal verbs and as an indirect object. Indirect objects are usually people. For example: “The teacher gives the book to the boy. / Der Lehrer gibt dem Jungen das Buch”. "The boy / dem Jungen" would be the indirect object. There are many tutorials in the internet where you can find out which prepositions use the accusative or dativ case. I wish you good luck.

              August 3, 2017

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guend1

              why not: "made of an egg"

              August 23, 2017

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
              Mod

                In this context that doesn't sound right.

                October 27, 2018

                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mhku722

                reported this in Der Hund gibt einen Apfel einem Mann, but I am reporting it here as well. In the audio when played normal you hear "einem", but when you play it slow, Dou very clearly states "einen".

                December 28, 2017

                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Slobodan89

                But question for Dativ is - for whom?/ to whom? - not from whom. It would make more sense if this sentence was in Genitive.

                January 16, 2018

                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

                Those may be good questions for the dative standing on its own.

                Ich kaufe dir ein Buch. For whom do I buy the book? For you.

                Ich gebe dir ein Buch. To whom do I give the book? To you.

                But here the dative stands after a preposition and it's the preposition that determines the case. aus takes the dative case in German, not the genitive.

                January 17, 2018

                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaeganJean

                So, is it because "it" (whatever it is) is 'from an egg' the egg is dative because the "it" would be accusitive? Ot can this statement be another case in a different situation? Like the sentance "the bird came from an egg" would it be said "der Vogel kommt aus einem Ei"? Or would it be "der Vogel kommt aus ein ei?"

                February 6, 2018

                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

                The preposition aus always requires the dative case in the noun that follows.

                So aus einem Ei will always have dative einem, regardless of whether there are other dative, accusative, nominative, or genitive nouns elsewhere in the sentence.

                February 7, 2018

                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rufiruti

                Exactly, and to give an other example: Aus einer Tüte (die Tüte) / Aus den Tüten / Aus einem Baumstamm

                February 7, 2018

                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/azeez969674

                after aus i should always use a dative form ????

                June 19, 2018

                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katherle

                Yes.

                June 19, 2018

                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

                That's right.

                June 19, 2018

                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pureintellect

                Please- someone help me! I really do not understand this. Can someone explain this concept?

                November 4, 2015

                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
                Mod

                  Which concept? Eggs? Or dative case?

                  January 9, 2016

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarvinTom

                  "Einem" comes thru sounding like "einen"

                  October 28, 2016

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SiobhnONei

                  I am so confused with this einum stuff.

                  December 7, 2016

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kalen95

                  why einem?

                  February 28, 2017

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chartsman

                  Already answered, read the discussion before asking.

                  May 8, 2017

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrs886629

                  Why Einem and not Einen?

                  May 8, 2017

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chartsman

                  Already answered several times, why don't you read the discussion first?

                  May 8, 2017

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katherle

                  "Aus" is a dative preposition, i.e. it's always followed by the dative case.

                  "Ei" is neuter, and "einem" is the indefinite article ("a") used for neuter and masculine dative.

                  "Einen" is masculine accusative, i.e. the wrong case and the wrong gender here.

                  See also my comment and the links below.

                  May 8, 2017

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DamirMarti

                  In fact it should be Genitiv but in modern German it is Dativ

                  February 2, 2019

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

                  Say what?

                  I don't think aus has ever been used with the genitive.

                  February 2, 2019

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoAl2

                  could this also be used to indicate that "you're making something out of an egg" for example food, or it's just to indicate that DUO did indeed come out from the egg? :)

                  August 5, 2014

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
                  Mod

                    This would be interpreted in the second way. But it could also mean the first way. Just as the English phrase "From an egg".

                    A later Duolingo lesson teaches some other meanings of aus.

                    January 9, 2016

                    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malsitibou

                    I guess they want say that "Dativ always come after (Aus) "

                    April 13, 2016

                    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/snapdragon77
                    January 25, 2017

                    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bubbawski

                    What's wrong with 'Out an egg'? I feel like that makes perfect sense?

                    February 1, 2016

                    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
                    Mod

                      I disagree. Can you use it in a sentence?

                      February 1, 2016

                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bubbawski

                      'The chicken came out an egg'

                      February 1, 2016

                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
                      Mod

                        No, that doesn't sound right to me. If you're a native English-speaker I'm interested to know where from, but if you're not then just take it as a lesson that it should be "out of an egg".

                        February 1, 2016

                        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bubbawski

                        I forgot that 'aus' can also be translated as 'from', translating the sentence as 'from an egg' makes more sense to me. Thanks for your help!

                        February 2, 2016

                        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/northernguy

                        Bubbawski

                        Your sentence is unclear as to whether an egg came out of a chicken or a chicken came out of an egg. That is because an essential element of your sentence is missing.

                        February 1, 2016

                        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bubbawski

                        In hindsight, 'out an egg' does sound wrong. I think if 'aus' is translated as 'from' the sentence makes much more sense. Thanks for your help!

                        February 2, 2016
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