1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: French
  4. >
  5. "I like jam."

"I like jam."

Translation:J'aime la confiture.

February 15, 2013

69 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zendelo

Why isn't it J'aime du confiture?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tagawa

Confiture is feminine so it's "de la confiture" rather than "du confiture". However, the verb "aimer" is an exception to the "de la" rule so "de la confiture" becomes just "la confiture". See Marrepar's better explanation below.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bobadapexte

So it happens to all feminines and "du" or is it an exception?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tagawa

It happens to all nouns, masculine and feminine, that follow a "preference verb" such as aimer, détester, adorer and préférer. For example:

J'aime la bière mais je préfère le vin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gomperzz

I don't understand why this one excludes de la. If I said I liked pork wouldn't it be J'aime du porc? Du being de + le.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marrepar

The verb "aimer" (and some other verbs stating a preference, a liking or a detest) is an exception to the rule that you use an indefinite article where you would use none in the English language.

So when you use "aimer" (or "détester", "préférer", "adorer"...) in a sentence the object will have a definite article before it (so it's "J'aime le porc" or "Je déteste le football", for example).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cmuehl

Awesome! Yet another exception :) Thanks for the good explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RedeemtheTime

Good explanation, Marrepar. But rather the >object< will have a definite article before it, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marrepar

Yes, you're absolutely right! I'm sorry for the confusion.

I am not a native English (nor French) speaker and I get them confused sometimes :p


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RedeemtheTime

We knew what you meant. Thanks again.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AabLevellen

Isn't it more like a super general use of the determinant article le/la/les that is about the idea of [object]?

What I'm trying to say is that there exists three mutually excluding uses of articles: le/la/les as determinant article pointing to a specific object, du/de la/de l'/des as partitive article pointing to a general object, subset of the object, part of the object, and, finally, le/la/les as a super genersl article pointing to a genersl idea of the object, all instances of the object in all times.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/estrellaerdman

I am still confused even after reading all the explanations! I hate exceptions!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mmullins78

the dude is saying that if you like something, dont like something, love something, you will use the definite article. j'aime LA confiture. but i think it should be said that, if you do something with the jam its de la or du, like "je mange de la confiture." i am eating some jam. by doing the action you need to use "some" because you cant eat ALL the jam in the world so you dont use the definite article, but, you do eat some of it. does that make sense?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KhariBryan

Ok, so if the subject was masculine it would be "le", example: "j'aime le poulet". But if I am eating some chicken it is "je mange du poulet", am I correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mmullins78

yes. in my explanation LA confiture b/c that is a feminine word. J'aime LE vin = I like wine. Je bois du vin = i drink wine. Those are two masculine examples. you are correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stephen-lee

the translation has no "de" before "la", which means "i like THE jam"!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mmullins78

keep in mind that languages and rules pertaining to that language are not always going to translate exactly word for word. yes, it appears its THE jam, but even in english there are exceptions to a rule, in this french case, its if you like something iyou use the definite article, if you DO SOMETHING with the jam, etc, you have to use indefinite article. j'aime la biere. je bois de la biere. you dig?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raeskates

Adding "bien" to the sentence just emphasizes that you "really" like the jam.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heliumxenon

Why doesn't it say "I like the jam"? Wasn't it "I like the zoo" -> J'aime le zoo etc.? Is there a difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/noxure

Jam and butter are substances (abstract) while the zoo is a place (concrete). That's why "la confiture" is a generalization, while the "le zoo" is specific in the given context.

If I remember correctly, if you want to talk about a specific jam it's "cette confiture". And if you want to generalize zoo's you have to use the use the plural: "les zoos".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RedeemtheTime

So would one ever write "J'aime du confiture"? And what would that mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pasunparisien

As explained above, no... 'confiture' is a feminine noun, so, 'de la' (not du) would apply, but see the exception stated above regarding verbs such as aimer, détester, préférer or adorer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heliumxenon

Ah, I didn't know that! Thank you, that was very helpful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cromwellt

Substances are not abstract, they are non-count concrete nouns. Abstract nouns are e.g. freedom, solvency. However, the idea behind your explanation is correct: You use different words to talk about non-count nouns, like if you want to talk about a certain particular water as opposed to water in general (unlike while talking about one zoo or a bunch of zoos).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mshahat

why 'j'aime la confiture' and not du confiture ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cobold

see answer by Marrepar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oreoginger

Why is J'aime de la confiture wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cobold

see answer by Marrepar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Styles_Big_D

I put "J'aime de la confiture" and it said it was wrong? Is it incorrect to use de la here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cobold

see answer by Marrepar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devutami7

can someone please explain why they suggest "J'aime bien la confiture". does 'bien' also act as an article? thanks in advance


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AabLevellen

Aimer means both to like amd to love. But when one wants to express that one likes something/someone rather than loves it/that person, the usual way is to use aimer bien which means to like a lot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devutami7

ahahah thanks a lot, i've just seen your answer after freakin' 4 months :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NamNum

Duo suggested the right answer is "J'aime bien la confiture". 'Bien' is very right? Can i have some info about this please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AabLevellen

Aimer bien=to like a lot, to like very much.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akshay_Chawdhry

Why cant it be j'aime confiture? it doesn't say I love the jam..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AabLevellen

First, French always needs an article.

In this case, the la has a different meaning than the usual the. Here, together with the verb aimer, it means the jam in general, the idea of jam, all jam in the world and of all times.

The "normal" way to express generality is by the partitive articles du/de la/de l'/des which means some (portion/part of) something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KimSCasey

they gave a second translation as "J'aime bien la confiture. Did anyone else get that alternate translation? What does "I like well the jam" ????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AabLevellen

It means I like jam a lot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lolajm

what does the acronym BANGS stand for


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blue_Eyes59

I don't know for the N but in my French class we learned BAGS ... It stands for Beauty, Age, Goodness, and Size. Any adjective that deals with beauty, age, goodness, or size goes before the noun. i.e. La belle femme - the beautiful lady, Le jeune homme - the young an, le bon ami - the good friend, la petite fille - the little girl.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnStanto

Why did I get "J'aime bien la confiture" as the so-called correct answer??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AabLevellen

It means I like jam very much.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/levity2n

why not J'aime de la confiture


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AabLevellen

See previous answers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gashah143

Why we need to use "la" before confiture??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raeskates

If you use hate, love, like, you use the definite article (le,la, les) with it. It is used to say what you like, or hate "in general". It is not translated in English. Use the partitive article which means some/any when you discusd a non specified quantity of something. The partituve article is "du" for the mascline, de la for the feminine and "des" for the plural. If the sentence.is negative use "de"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Muhammad.Sadeq

why " J'aime dela confiture " is wrong !? >.<


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raeskates

Yes, because in French if you use the "de la" , it is saying I like "some" jam and really you don't like jam at all, so you use the definite article (le, la, l", les) with it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JinaJinaee

it should be "J'aime de la confiture" because confiture is feminan. the answers are wrong!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cobold

see answer by Marrepar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/allyawesome13

Wouldnt that be i like the jam? Because la means the but thr sentence says i like jam?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shubi95

De la confiture = jam and not la confiture that means the jam


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/imafuckingsnail

could you say "J'aime du confiture" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blue_Eyes59

No. Du is the contraction of de + le. Confiture is feminine so you would use la not le.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blue_Eyes59

Marrepar explains is fairly well above ⬆


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Big_See

Thanks for the explanations, guys. Although i knew it was an exception for 'aimer', i never understood why! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidRussnak

Why is 'la' required here? I get why you wouldn't use the variations. I'm just wondering why we need that at all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WBAudis

Jam is like water in my opinion, uncountable. You can't have a water or a jam so why would you have the water or the jam? I would just say, I like jam. Unless you were describing a specific jam but the question didn't make that clear...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmySison-B

I said 'j'aime de la confiture,'and i got it wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blue_Eyes59

I'm confused. On the comments page here it gives the answer as "J'aime la confiture." But in my exercise it says the right answer is "J'aime le pétrin." What is pétrin? I understand why it isn't "J'aime du confiture." But I don't understand pétrin?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/petals86

Why do we have to put 'la' in front of confiture?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PrakhyaCv

Why do we need la before confiture?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ninjabenji1

it is not du confiture because du confiture is some jam therefore it is la confiture which is jam in general


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SALUT124

THEY HAVEN'T SAID " THE JAM " RIGHT , SO WHATS THE POINT OF TRANSLATING IT INTO " LA CONFITURE" . IDEALY IT SHOULD BE "J'AIME CONFITURE" WHAT'S WRONG WITH THAT ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leonie28516

How was I suppose to know this? :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leonie28516

Why is it this? Can some one please explain...

Learn French in just 5 minutes a day. For free.