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https://www.duolingo.com/avingham97

Why is the Spanish represented by a Spanish flag if it is Mexican Spanish?

I've noticed that the Spanish, although represented by a Spanish flag, is in fact, Latin American Spanish. They use "ustedes" instead of "vosotros" and the words are pronounced as they would b in Latin America. Also, the pronunciation of "Y" and "Ll" seem to have been switched.

4 years ago

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mercutio

Ohhhhh this is very confusing, I thought I was learning European Spanish, this could confuse a lot of peoples learning

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KATEJ15

I don't know what to do. I wished to learn (European) Spanish. Several weeks in and I am being told to say phonetically 'grass-ias' instead of 'gratfhias'. I think this would be unacceptable in Spain. I've never smoked but many years ago a young Spaniard taught me, phonetically, 'Tfhig ar ell yos' (cigarettes). Duolingo seems likely not to go with this. Abandon course or continue? If everyone in Spain would correct me, again and again, then this is not a Spanish course it is a Latin American Spanish Course. And does the absence of vosotros matter?! By the way Duolingo, 'American English' and 'English' are different enough to give occasional Duolingo translation fails quite bewilderingly for english paticipants. This is noted by many learners. I don't mind that but I want to be sure I am learning a Spanish that would be right in Spain. Oh, crikey!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arismartin

Hello...

I'm a native Spanish speaker and I have commented several times this issue. We have to ask ourselves if we want a formal education or a colloquial one. In my opinion DL provides to you a lot of skills that will let you "survive perfectly in whatever environment". Now, if you want a Spanish very close to the Spanish that is spoken in Spain, that is another thing. Is there a lot of difference? I can tell you some things and later, each one makes what he wants.

First. There are a few words that are not used in Spain, at least in the same sense. For example... Alberca, carro... There is also a different use of some verbs... Manejar por conducir, comé por come... and a few more. Second, there are expressions that are not builded in a Spanish way... The use of "por" in temporary sentences "estuve fuera por tres años" per "estuve fuera tres años". The sentencies are a bit wordy, maybe in order to practice the pronouns and articles. At last the sentences seem some tricky... Third, don't worry for your accent, your English accent will be more noticed that another one you have.

Well, you imagine that is going to buy a coat, the vendor presents you a normal coat... You look it and ask to vendor... Will it serve to me in the Himalayas? If you want to teach English or find a job (that is a joke) in Spain, DL doesn't the best option, even touch it can be a good point of departure. But if you want to come here and speak with some Spanish people, don't worry, you will not have any problem. Where you arrive, they will teach you the particular idioms and if it's necessary to change some words, change them. That's all.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/A.Igor
A.Igor
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It became even worse. Now they use un carro and not un coche, un sandwich and not un emparedado or un bocadillo. It sounds so wrong...

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arismartin

Hi, Well, I was using Duo for a couple of years and I found a few words that we don’t use, nothing serious. In general Duo does well the work what it was created for. It’s a great method and you can pick up a lot of basic vocabulary and get basic skills to communicate with other people. Don’t forget that there are two ways to approach a language, the first one is to get the capacity or ability to communicate with other people in a general context, you ask for directions, you ask for something to eat, you can understand some instructions and you can manage some situations. You don’t need a lot of grammar or rules because you are trying to ‘survive’, ok? The second one is to get a deep knowledge of a language, you are going to use it for a job, for managing complexes situations and in a context where you can’t make a lot of mistakes and you want to write and speak the way a native would do...more o less. Then Duo is a start, but you will have to do a lot more of things. There are methods that work fine for this but you’ll have to pay for them and dedicate a lot of time listening to, reading and every now and then revising a bit the grammar.

You have to consider your goals and then look for the best options to get there. Duo will allow you to be understood and solving some kind of situations, but if you want to sound and write like a Spanish you’ll have to do something else, a lot more in fact...

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/A.Igor
A.Igor
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I know :) I use it time to time to remind some basic words which I don’t use often. But actually I learned Spanish before my Duolingo membership

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynxlynxlynx

It originated there, but lesson notes do mention the differences sometimes.

But yeah, in general the concept is flawed, since there is no 1:1 mapping between languages and countries.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/avingham97

I don't think learning Latin American Spanish is a problem, I was just confused for a second. And actually, there is a slight difference in the pronunciation of Y and Ll in a lot of places. It was just odd and interesting to me to get things wrong in my first language due to a choice of word which was synonymous with the word they chose :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AHuss100

I really want to learn European Spanish as I am from the UK and actually go to Spain where I'd like to be able to speak the language confidently. I never go to Mexico or South America, why isn't European Spanish an option?!?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hamsters4

Likewise, I did not realise until I went over to Spain on holiday there might be a difference from what I had been learning for 6 months...I was politely corrected on my first day, and just put it down to local dialect. My suspicions were heightened when my good lady started formal class learning, and I did not understand much of it. Feel like I have partually wasted my time, now wondering whether to continue with it or not?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lenkvist
Lenkvist
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Y and ll are pronounced the same, right? I think they took a general Spanish flag as it isn't supposed to be specifically Mexican Spanish.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankySka
FrankySka
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yep, see here: https://www.duolingo.com/course/es/en

"Spoken in 21 countries, many with beautiful beaches and ancient cultures, Spanish is one of the most important languages in the western hemisphere and the third most spoken language in the world. On Duolingo, you'll learn a version of Spanish closer to what you'd hear in Latin America than in Spain, but the differences are relatively small and everybody will be able to understand you."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
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Yeah, it makes a lot more sense to use the Spanish flag because:

  1. It's not specifically Mexican; it's hard to assign this type of Spanish to any one country
  2. The Mexican flag is very similar to the Italian
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tmarvin
tmarvin
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The only languages where Duo uses the flag of a colony rather than the language's mother tongue are Portuguese and English, where Brazil has a population 20 times Portugal and the US five times the UK. Spanish doesn't meet that criteria of overwhelmingly being most spoken as the native language in a single colonial country.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlejoPF
AlejoPF
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You're right. Mexicans are around 25% of spanish speakers, while Spaniards, Colombians and Argentinians are around 10% each one.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucolaf
lucolaf
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Mexico has 3 times the population of Spain. But anyway if they want to keep the spanish flag they should then change the logo, but not put a mexican symbol. Mexico is an independent country, not a colony

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gen912
Gen912
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About "y" and "ll", they are pronounced the same in Mexican Spanish and in most countries of Latin America - there is a name for that linguistic phenomenon: "yeísmo"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ye%C3%ADsmo

However, in most parts of Spain, Colombia, Peru, and Bolivia (have a look at the map on the Wiki page) the pronounciation of "ll" is different from "y".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cutehamstergirl

Actually, my mom is from Mexico City and she told me to pronounce the ll like an English j,but then my Spanish teacher from Spain told me to pronounce ll like y so I got really confused,so I asked my mom about it and she told me that that was wrong that you can only pronounce ll like an English j,but then I asked my Spanish teacher about it and she told me it depends on where you're from;if you're from Mexico or anywhere else in Latin America you pronounce the ll like an English j, but if you're from Europe like her,then you pronounce ll like y. So now I'm really confused because everybody's telling me something different........

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ranaamarilla
ranaamarilla
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I'm from Venezuela and Spanish is taught here in Duolingo has a neutral accent does not resemble the Mexican accent

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0liwia
0liwia
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Maybe not, but it's clearly not Spanish from Spain. Many words from Spain aren't taught here and even often not accepted by the system. So it's frustrating to see a Spanish flag when it's not even accepting Spanish from Spain.

(just like Brits are frustrated with the English part and keep saying their perfectly correct - by UK standards - sentences are marked wrong.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arismartin

It's true that I cannot assign that voice to an aggressive accent of a particular country, but it can say with absolute reliability that it is no neutral at all. Said that, also is true that the voice can be understood without problems. But if someone wants to learn, for any reason, the "español" accent, this is not the most desirable program... Even tough the Spanish language also have variants in Spain, no one them match the voice that we hear here.

I'm from Spain, and I live here all life, and I would like to know if the accent of the voice US in the application is neutral or it become American-Mexican as well.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/matchboxdisaster

I am confused now too... Are there a lot of differences between Mexican Spanish and European Spanish?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Abykale
Abykale
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There are two major areas of difference: 1) the vosotros form (plural of tú) is used in Spain but not Latin America, and is not taught in the Duolingo course. European Spanish speakers will understand you just fine when you use Ustedes, but it might be a bit confusing for you listening/reading European Spanish if you're completely unfamiliar with it. 2) pronunciation. European Spanish pronounces the c and z like an English th (sounds like a lisp if you're not familiar with it). There are a few other minor differences. I haven't found this a major barrier to understanding, but like any accent different from what you're used to hearing, it does take a bit of getting used to.

There are vocabulary differences too, but my impression is that they're pretty minor, really not much different than the differences between various countries within Latin America.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arismartin

No. There are something, also related with the people education. If we go to a colloquial language (for instance Cantinflas) can be many, but in formal language and literature not. What it is important is the pronunciation. The accent is recognizable easily.

The question is why Spain or UK don't have a program like this? It's important because at schools of many countries, students practice the formal languages, Spanish and British, and when mix what they learn there and here... The result may be no too good. But whole Europe is in a whole decadence, economics, politics, cultural... And this is what there is.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ankaica
ankaica
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Short answer: No.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lawrencelee101

i know right

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucolaf
lucolaf
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And they use a Mexican pyramid as a logo, so of course they should put the Mexican Flag instead of the Spanish one. Just as they put the american one ( not the british) for the english course or the Brazilian one ( not the portuguese) for the portuguese course

1 year ago