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"Until now"

Translation:Fino ad ora

February 16, 2013

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatarinaRankovic

why can't you say "finche ora"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jumano82

Why not "Fino adesso"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElizabethJ

my Spanish always surfaces!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulinaDiaz

en este nivel mi ingles empieza a fallar tambien :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elena18

Probablamente es muy deficil apprender una lungu nueva usando una otra lingua que no hablas FLUENTLY I can empathize!!! (Scusi- ma non parlo bene ESPANOL :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vigoreux

I think it's worse when you're taking the test in your second language, get it wrong, and realize that it's similar to your native language. Happens a lot to bilinguals that focus on one of the two languages at a given time. x_x;


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lukman.ku

Not "Fino all'ora"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elena18

Is "Prima di ora" correct too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PleaseRemove

You can also say "Finora", right? That's what I learned from someone, but Duolingo says it's wrong... Or is there a difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nitsan.em

When do you use fin and when do you use fino?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brinkmoney

I thought using "a" or "ad" was simply preference. I got it wrong because I used "a" :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nano-rama

no, when there is a vowel at the beginning of the next word, you add the "d", otherwise it's hard to string together in speech. Many languages do this, including English ("a boy" but "an apple").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/petriq

Does someone know the difference between "fino a" and "finché"?

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