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  5. "Δεν πρόκειται να διαβάσουν."

"Δεν πρόκειται να διαβάσουν."

Translation:They are not going to read.

December 19, 2016

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fazulakis

What about "they are not about to read"? Would it be acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Glossmad

I was marked wrong for 'they will not read', which is much the same meaning as 'they are not going to read'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 296

In English, we distinguish "going to" as a planned action where some preparation might have been made, in other words, more definite whereas "will" is used for non-planned, perhaps a rapid decision etc. We used "going to" here because "πρόκειται να" indicates a plan.

http://www.grammar.cl/Notes/Future_Will_vs_Going.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dyscretio

That's really interesting. I had never thought about there being any difference between the two, despite (or perhaps because of) English being my native tongue, but looking at the examples in that link I agree that it would sound weird, for instance, to say "I will go to the movies" unless you were just then deciding to go. Learn something new every day!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaleighStarbuck

Hmm...I read the information in that link, and I am not actually wholly convinced. I admit that the very last example does sound a bit weird with "Yes, I will go to the movies" but that weirdness is dependent on the question posed before...Instead of "Are you busy this evening?" if the question were "Do you want to do something together this evening?" the answer "Yes, I will go to the movies" sounds just fine (indeed, it's the opposite- it would sound weird to answer "Yes, I am going to the movies" in that case)...I don't know if all my foreign language learning has influenced me or what (my native language is (American) English), but even if I am an odd case, I still think that, since there is no specific context, "They will not read" should be an acceptable translation for this exercise...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hMQS4KHs

"They aren't going to read." This should be accepted as an alternative translation. The only difference is the apostrophe as in aren't instead of "are not" .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 296
<pre> "aren't" has been added </pre>

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hafizen

Too colloquial, perhaps?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 296

I'm afraid so. One thing I was taught many years ago was: You never write "gonna" unless you are quoting someone. He said, "I'm gonna go tomorrow."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hafizen

Thanks, Jaye!

I know it drives school teachers crazy, but it’s very well established in the American vernacular. I imagine the o’clock contraction had a similarly bumpy journey into acceptance. The one I cannot get my head around, though, is “hella” and its more polite sibling “hecka”. Their usage seems to contradict their origin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 296

Yes, a lot of what we now accepted took a long time to be accepted. There's no explaining what is and isn't in the end.

Thank you for your understanding and your constructive input.

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