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"L'enfant fait un pas."

Translation:The child takes a step.

5 years ago

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/sgb4914

In America, we would never say, "makes" a step for walking.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_Avencia_
_Avencia_
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Probably, but the verb "faire" in French works as both "to make" and "to do"..."The child does a step" makes a bit more sense, at least as much as our own "takes a step", I think.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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There is no "does a step" in English unless you're talking about dance moves. We need to understand that "faire" is the third most common verb in French (after être and avoir) and that it has a HUGE range of applications. It is not always just "make" or "do". When translating to English, we have to use natural (idiomatic) English and "fait un pas" is "takes a step". In other context, e.g., il fait un pas dans le jardin, it can be even simpler, "he steps into the garden".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duogm

@nz6s, why isnt the 't' in "fait" being pronounced since the next word starts with a vowel sound.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Lawless tells us that a liaison following a verb is a very high register. It's optional anyway, so don't expect to see it used here. The issue of liaisons has many rules between required liaisons, forbidden liaisons and optional liaisons. If you're interested in learning more, dig around thoughtco.com. https://www.thoughtco.com/how-to-pronounce-optional-liaisons-french-4083604

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnetteKelly

Strangely enough, this links to Spanish pronunciation but you have piqued my interest and the search is on.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

Hi AnnetteKelly, here is a link with information on liaisons: https://www.lawlessfrench.com/pronunciation/optional-liaisons/

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StankinJankin

Cool story

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GenevieveM464210

What is fais un pas

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

Can you hover over it?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

I think GenevieveM464210 was asking a question about a phrase not found in this exercise, perhaps having seen it somewhere before, and is confused about seeing fait un pas with a T not S.

The phrase faire un pas means "to take a step" and the word faire is conjugated to agree with the subject:

Je fais un pas = I take a step

Tu fais un pas = You take a step

Il/elle fait un pas = He/she takes a step

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnLCarlisle

ok I know I didn't see "ne pas" but I did see "pas" what does pas do here?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

It's a noun meaning "step".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CSA_GW
CSA_GW
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I wonder why "L'enfant" cannot be translated as "the baby"? While child is more generic, I think baby is perfect for one who just start walking.

Helps please?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Who said the child has just started walking?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frenchyboy5

Why can't we say "The child's taking a step?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

I think the problem is in the contraction. Duo prefers that you write complete words: The child is taking a step. This is important because for all we know someone whose English is rusty might write that contraction meaning the child has taking a step which would be wrong. Spelling out the words leaves no room for doubt or confusion about whether you really are translating the French accurately.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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When you use contractions in this fashion, be aware that you are placing a burden on the owl's brain. We already use the « 's » form to show possession. Then there are contractions with both "is" and "has". To the computer, they all look alike. You need to know this, the use of all the contractions is what is causing the insane feedback from the computer such as, it's not "it is", it's "it's. Add to this mess the practice of contracting "has" not only when it is used as an auxiliary verb (he has spoken) but when "has" is used to mean "possess" (which is considered wrong pretty much everywhere) but still used in some regions. This practice results in such memorable sentences as "he's a new car". The bottom line is that a lot of things may be possible when it comes to contractions, but they create far more grief than you can imagine when they are used in DL's exercises. Some, like "let's" are actually preferred to "let us" but you will never be counted wrong by avoiding contractions in the exercises.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NateBanas

should there be a T liason between "fait" and "un"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/charnfield
charnfield
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Is an infant not the same as a child but it was marked wrong?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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an infant generally translates to "petit enfant, nourrisson, nouveau-né".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fizzy_wizzie

this is confusing for me I thought enfant meant student. that's what my French teacher calls us. and yes I am familiar that etudiant something like that is also student.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

Then she's just calling you "children" which isn't such an unusual thing for teachers to call students up to a certain grade. You'll get from some teachers in English too: "Quiet down, children. It's time for math." But it's not a synonym for student. It just so happens that students are often children too.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WilliamQuill
WilliamQuillPlus
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Why isn't infant acceptable here? Perhaps not preferred, but at least allowed.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Because FR "enfant" means "child", not infant. EN "infant" = le bébé (ou) le nourrisson.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaden482934
Jaden482934
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why can't i say "the kid" instead of "the child"?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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L'enfant = the child: standard register of speech.

The kid = le gamin/la gamine: informal register of speech

1 month ago