https://www.duolingo.com/Ellie-369

the "y" in У тебя есть хобби, and many more.

  • У тебя есть хобби translation: do you have a hobby?

I'm just wondering why the "y" is there?
Is it there to make the sentences correct in what you are saying, or is it there because of a word. ( because without it it wouldn't make sense).
Or maybe the way the word is formed, or because of the being verb?
Sorry I am asking so many questions. :(. Well, thanks, -Elena.

December 21, 2016

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Raven31568

In Russian language we don't say literally "ТЫ ИМЕЕШЬ хобби". We are saying "У ТЕБЯ ЕСТЬ хобби".
Ex.

  • she has - у нее есть
  • I have - у меня есть

So, there's a rule that you must say preposition "У" then the pronoun in genetive case and the verb есть
Check it http://masterrussian.com/aa120199a.shtml

December 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ellie-369

ok, thanks. that is helpful. :)

December 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
Mod
  • 1429

"У" is a preposition which is closest to English "by" (as in "by my side", not "by the means of"). Hence the construction "У меня (есть) X" is literally translated as something like "X is by my side/with me", with the actual meaning "I have X".

December 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Enzfj2
  • 1090

For people, this У means 'in posession' or 'have with':

У меня есть книга - I have a book

У меня с собой книга - I have a book with me

But for objects it means 'by' or 'near 'у моря' = 'by the sea'

It was discussed also here: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/11667630

December 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Zeitschleifer

Is "by my side" not "на моей стороне"?

December 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
Mod
  • 1429

That too, but that's already a derivative expression (originating from the literal translation of "someone standing next to me") and not the meaning I had in mind here.

December 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ellie-369

ok, thanks. :)

December 22, 2016

[deactivated user]

    Why is none of this discussed in the actual lessons-or even in the tips? Using this site to learn Russian was one of the biggest mistakes of my life....I have a trip to Russia in 2 weeks and I AM LOST!!!

    October 8, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Zeitschleifer

    Just translate "Do you have something?" as "У тебя есть что-нибудь?".

    "Ты имеешь" can sound strange or even have additional meanings.

    December 22, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/Ellie-369

    Thanks. :)

    December 22, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/Raven31568

    Sometimes we can use the verb "иметь" when speaking about essential things (rules, duties) though. But this occurs very rarely in popular expressions.

    Examples:

    • Я имею право/обязанность - I have a right/duty
    • Вы имеете право хранить молчание... - You have the right to remain silent
    • Я имею честь представить вам... - I have the honor to introduce to you...
    December 22, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/Ellie-369

    ok, thanks

    December 22, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/WHeary

    In russian y is kinda like a grammatical word. As a fluent russian speaker, I myself have tried to translate this word many times, but its just one of those words which have no proper meaning. Its a grammatical word used to explain if someone owns something (kind of). У меня есть яблоко, у него есть яблоко. I hope my reply makes sense to you. Sorry of it doesn't.. :)

    December 23, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/Ellie-369

    ya it does, thank you

    December 23, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/WHeary

    No problem :)

    December 23, 2016
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