"Veux-tu manger quelque chose ?"

Translation:Do you want to eat something?

February 16, 2013

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/angelo000

How come the first translation for 'quelque' is 'something,' yet 'chose' still has to be added to 'quelque?' In fairness, Duolingo also put 'some/any' in the translation for 'quelque' and 'thing' for chose...

May 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/melissapleasance

Maybe this is incorrect, and correct me if I'm wrong anyone: The way that i have been looking at 'quelque' is with the definition as "some-". Quelquefois- sometime; quelqu'un- someone; quelque chose- something. I look for the different endings to complete the word

October 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/annag

I think it's that "quelque" is "somewhat" or, perhaps, "which-that", but "chose" is definitely "thing". Does that help, at all?

February 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/ynwa12

Why do you have to say "quelque" AND "chose"? I see that they can mean different things but in this sentence they both mean something, right?

October 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Cazeee

I think they mean "some" and "thing", separately (and respectively), thus it only makes sense when they're together.

April 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mindbusiness

Aren't we supposed to use "anything" instead of "something" in English questions?

February 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/antlane

We use both some and any in questions. We use some/somebody/something to talk about a person or thing that we know exists, or we think exists: Are you waiting for somebody? (I think you are waiting for somebody) We use some in questions when we offer or ask for things: Would you like something to eat? (there is something to eat) Can I have some sugar, please? (there is probably some sugar I can have) But in most questions, we use any. We do not know if the thing or person exists: 'Do you have any luggage?' 'No, I don't.' I can't find my bag. Has anybody seen it?(R.Murphy, pg.170)

September 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Prad_Sat

Hi, can anyone tell why is it 'manger' and not 'manges' since there is 'Tu' in the structure? Thanks

March 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/antlane

TU VEUX MANGER = YOU WANT TO EAT// VEUX-TU MANGER? = DO YOU WANT TO EAT? ( manger = to eat - infinitive)

March 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/bdoing

The second verb has to be in the infinitive (what we usually learn as the 'base' form, in this case manger). We do this in english, too -- "Je veux manger" is "I want to eat", where "to eat" is the infinitive. :)

July 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Fairlie

why is 'do you want something to eat?' incorrect?

February 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Ankhwearer

because "something to eat" would be grammatically different, like "quelque chose à manger". Here we are starting with the verb, not the noun.

March 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Gurney_c

Why not "Would you like to eat something?"?

July 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/sallywmcc

I suppose it is because "would you like to eat something" would translate to the conditional, "voudrais tu mange quelque chose"

July 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/tracypaper

I think because veux = want. I think "aimes-tu" would be closer to "Would you like to eat something?". But I am not positive on that. These are slightly confusing o_O

October 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/annag

It could be "voudrais tu" or "voulez-vous". Voulez-vous manger avec moi, ce soir? (would you like to eat with me, this evening?) :-P

February 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/adam2347

Would it be incorrect to say "Tu veux manger quelque chose?" or "Est ce que tu veux manger quelque chose?"

January 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/annag

I'm not certain whether each is technically correct, but I think either would make sense.

February 25, 2014
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