"Jestem teraz w pracy."

Translation:I am at work now.

December 25, 2016

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/catface123

Can't you say 'I'm IN work now?'

December 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei
Mod
  • 2

Quote from a native: "That's saying you have a job, not that you are at your workplace."

December 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/C.Amaro1981

Can i say "Jestem w pracy teraz"

March 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Emwue

You can, but it answers a different question:

  • 'Where are you now?' – „Jestem teraz w pracy”
  • 'What are you doing now? – „Jestem w pracy teraz”
March 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zagadka314

Word order actually matters for once! :o

April 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/obado

'where are you?' 'I am in work now' - should be accepted (I have a first class honours degree in English)

April 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zagadka314

Sorry, but you can't be "in" work here. You can be "at" most specific places but you usually can't be "in" them. That is why you can be at home, at school, etc, but not "in home" or "in school." "In ___" usually means something different, if it is correct at all. For example, "in school" = "I am a student," and "in [the] hospital" = "I am sick/a patient."

April 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/obado

I don't mean to be rude, but you are wrong. I am a writer, have taught my native language English, have an English degree. I don't mean to sound arrogant, but I have no doubt about my level of English skills. If I phoned someone and said "where are you?" and they said "I can't talk, I am in work" I would be absolutely happy that they had mastery of the English language. You are right that you can't say "in home", but yes you can say in work, and you can say in school. "He is in school today" is perfect English. May I ask you what your native language is?

April 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zagadka314

Age has nothing to do with facts. Maybe it works in your dialect, but certainly not in ASE, and I doubt it does in BSE. You could say something like, "She is immersed in work," but that says nothing about location.

I am a native American English speaker and an EFL English teacher.

Here is a related SE post: http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/70849/in-work-vs-at-work

April 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/obado

Then I think I understand our disagreement (I don't remember anything being said about age). It shows a difference between American and British English. From what you say it doesn't work in American English, but in my dialect, standard British English, it certainly does work. I think it's great that there are differences between our dialects, and I only began to comment because my answer, which I assure you is correct in Southern England and in Wales, in both educated and less educated contexts, was marked as wrong. I am happy to leave it there, but previously I have noticed that American and British versions have both been allowed, which I think is the best way since Americans and Britons might be learning Polish, and Duolingo should be marking our Polish, not our English.

April 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zagadka314

Huh… I somehow saw "wrong" as "young." I've accidently "seen" the wrong word before, but that one is VERY different.

Are you sure it is in standard British English? Could you show me a source for that?

I wish Duolingo would allow us to choose dialects. I would like an American English course, British English course, and even more (Canadian, Indian, etc). Unfortunately, Duolingo forces American English only, but many groups decided to accept all the dialects in one. This can make things more confusing than focusing on one dialect.

April 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/obado

zagadka314, it's not letting me reply below your comment for some reason. I don't know that I can give you a source, but I will have a look. Meanwhile I can expand a bit. If you had multiple workplaces you would never say "in work" in the way I claim, but if you worked in a specific office or workshop you could do so, as though it were an abbreviation of "I am in my workplace". As for "in school", that sounds even more normal. But in Britain school finishes at 15 or 16, whereas I believe in America you can use it interchangeably with college or university for an older student. So in British English "she is in school" means of someone up to 15-16 that their current location is their particular school. Of an older person you couldn't use it this way, but I could say that my son is "in college today" (except that it is the Easter break). I hope this clarifies things a bit, and I apologise if my tone was a bit impatient. I have seen non-native speakers claim strange usages or deny normal ones. Thanks for your contributions, which help my Polish journey :)

April 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zagadka314

The Duolingo comment system has a limit on nested replies. It basically must limit this due to the limited space.

Where I am from, you can't be "in" a specific workplace. You can be "in" the workplace environment in a general context, which follows the usual pattern with in, on, at.

"We need more equality in the workplace" is an example.

I think "in school" is the only one that MIGHT be accepted at all, but would almost certainly be interpreted as "is a student." "In college" just doesn't make any sense except to mean "is a college student." I feel like if I knew someone was a native speaker and I asked where they are, and they said "in college," I'd probably repeat the question or ask something like, "You are at the college?"

It is the internet, we almost have to be more than impatient with each other ;)

April 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei
Mod
  • 2

Well, there's also the case of Polish people learning English by means of the 'reverse tree'... but still, if it's at least correct in the south of England, then added here as well.

April 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ash473779

Is 'pracy' here in the locative case? It looks like it's genitive case because of the 'y' ending.

July 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei
Mod
  • 2

It's Locative here. But yeah, Genitive would be the same (Nie mam pracy).

July 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/yf7rU0pd

Would 'I am at work for now' also be correct?

August 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei
Mod
  • 2

No, this seems to change the meaning.

September 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ScottC436051

My answer, " I am, right now, at work." was marked incorrect. It makes perfect sense in English, not sure why it was marked incorrect.

March 31, 2019
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