"C'est du café, mais il aime ça !"

Translation:It is coffee, but he likes it!

February 25, 2014

57 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/diegormromero

Shouldn't there be a liaison between mais and il?

July 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kubeberus

On some audio clips, I hear the liaison (the male speaker), but not on others (the female speaker). Which is correct?

July 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David332970

The liaison is there on the audio of both the male and female speakers.

March 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaftaliFri1

Found an answer yet?

January 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cob723

The liaison is correct

November 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thakelo

Just wondering... Could I say "C'est du café, mail il l'aime" instead of "ça"? Or is "l'aime" only reserved for people?

February 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/d.batta

"Le (as "la" e "les") is not necessarily reserved for people but I am quite sure that in this case you can't use it because of the partitive article "du". For example, the sentence "C'est le café le plus économique, mais je l'aime" should be correct, as we are talking about a specific coffee. In any case, it's an interesting question, I would like to hear the opinion of a native speaker :)

February 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Khaur

You're right in that "il l'aime" would refer to a specific coffee. But there's nothing wrong with referring to the specific coffee that he's been served. It would imply that he usually doesn't like coffee, but this specific one tastes good to him.

On the other hand, "C'est du café, mais il aime ça !" is saying that he likes coffee in general, the opposition introduced by mais is putting a distance, implying that maybe the speaker doesn't like coffee and finds somewhat surprising that he likes it.

February 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thakelo

Thanks for your answer!! by he, you mean someone else and not the speaker, right?

To be honest it took me a while to understand what you meant, but after reading it a couple of times it started making a lot of sense! So "le/la" is for specific things, whereas "ça" is way more general!

I found a comment in this forum ( http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1995548=24 ) that provides a few more examples (for the future readers):

Suppose someone asks you "tu aimes le canard?" If you answer "oui, je l'aime beaucoup," you have interpreted the question as referring to your pet duck, who doesn't have a name but whom you fondly refer to as "le canard." On the other hand, if you answer "oui, j'aime ça, mais je préfère la dinde," you are obviously not talking about your pet.

In other words, when the direct object of a verb like "aimer" is a singular noun introduced by a definite article, (as in "le canard") it looks like the choice of the object pronoun is determined by the value of the definite article, or rather it looks like the value of the definite article and the choice of object pronoun are both determined by what the noun really means: in one case it refers to one specific, countable thing or individual (Daffy, for instance) and there would be a definite article in English too ("the duck ate my homework"), in the other it refers to an uncountable concept (duck meat) or activity (eating said duck meat) and there would be no article in English ("I like duck but I prefer turkey"). In the first case, the equivalent object pronoun would be "le/la", in the second it would be "ça." The same conceptual difference exists in the mind of English speakers, since they can use an article in one case but not in the other.

Other examples:

Le cinéma ? - j'aime ça

Le dernier Woody Allen ? - je l'ai bien aimé.

la musique ? - j'aime beaucoup ça

la musique baroque? - j'adore ça

le canon de Pachelbel ? - je l'ai trop entendu, je ne l'aime plus du tout.

Thanks again for helping, guys :)

February 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Khaur

Yes indeed, that he is the subject of the sentence, not the speaker.

Funny though, that's not how I would interpret the first example in your quote (although that's a completely valid interpretation). I'd say the duck is not your pet, but your meal, and you're saying that the cook is good ;)

February 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thakelo

Haha I agree with that. But the overall comment is alright.

Thanks for the help, Khaur!

February 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thakelo

Ah, merci. It makes sense!

February 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexandraV274306

Yah why not, do you like your coffee? Oui je l'aime. *l' * is when you are talking about a specific thing, like, i like THAT coffee,

Its sure that in this sentence, its more like," its coffee but i like it anyway in general" kind of meaning, its not like he does like THIS coffee, the one you have in you hand.

November 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hakimsopiak

Why is there a need to have a "du" infront of '"cafe". Will the sentence still have the same meaning without it?

February 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1781

If you want to say "it's coffee", that is simply "c'est du café", where "du" is the article that is non-specific and not referring to a definite amount of it. I.e., "du café" just means "coffee".

October 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeonardoPolly

In spanish, it's possible to say "Es de café, pero le gusta" and, similarly, in portuguese, one would say "É de café, mas ele gosta". Both sentences mean "It's made of coffee, but he likes it". The french "C'est du café" seems like it could also be translated to "It's made of coffee"... Am I right? Or does it just have the meaning "It is coffee"? If I'm wrong, how would someone say "It's made of coffee"?

April 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fernand126

Maybe "C'est de café"? It seems to me the "du" is very specific for usage as "some" or for a general reference to something. Someone answer correctly, please. D:

May 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeonardoPolly

Yeah, I think you're right. Also, I'm pretty sure "Il est fait de café" would be a proper answer to my question, but I think nobody would say it like that

May 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/glorifai

C'est du café, mais il aime ça! ... why is "du" there ? Why can't it be 'C'est café, mais il aime ça!'? Rule please!

April 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1781

It's the partitive "du". You cannot just say "c'est café". You need an article.

October 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MehakAggar

It could also have been - "It is coffee, but he loves it" as aimer means to like/love. But it wasn't accepted

July 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1781

Duo's convention is that "aimer" = love when talking about people, but "like" with anything else. You may also say "aimer bien", but if you want to say "he loves it", it would be "il adore ça".

October 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IamShiv

when is ca (c with the cedila) used at the end of the sentence?

April 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carlosdelo10

When it is referring to the something that is being acted upon by the verb

Il aime ça

He loves -that-

January 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexandraV274306

Ça= cela (diminution for cela) Ex: ça fait mal= cela fait mal.

C'est= Cela est. Ex: c'est mal= cela est mal

We dont use Cela or Cela est in everydays life, we use ça and c'est, but it can helo you to know when use them :)

November 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WarOrdos

I'm rather confused by this. My translation was: "That is coffee, yet he likes it". This was marked wrong as they did not want "yet". Duolingo wanted "but". However mais can mean either but or yet. Is this just Duolingo being limited once again or am I in error in my interpretation?

I'm starting to get very frustrated with things like this across several modules but in particular the French tutorials.

February 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/helmi23

How would I say "it's from the cafe" ?

December 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Khaur

You would say "Ça vient du café", but you would usually qualify café to disambiguate from "It comes from coffee".

December 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarieRojas2

I am getting confused with the "aime" in what occasions do you use love or like?

June 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnUnicorn

If you aimer an inanimate object, you like it; and if you aimer a person, you love them (and not necessarily in a romantic way, IIRC).

June 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mariamemer

there is supposed to be a liasion between mais and il duolingo wyd

July 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elojen

Doesn't "C'est" mean "This is", not "It is"? I thought "Il est" was "It is".

May 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1781

"C'est" could be "it is", "this is", "that is", even "he is" or "she is" with the right context. You must understand what is meant before you can choose the right expression in English.

October 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexandraV274306

Same. C'est= cela est. CELA=IT, EST= IS. Dont use Cela est because its old french, but you you what its mean, C'est = cela est.

So HE= IL SHE= ELLE IT=CELA (OR CECI but you will not really use it)

Il est = he is Elle est= she is C'est = it is

November 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexandraV274306

I mean in quebec, probably in france they use more ceci or cela, like for the sentence that being said = ceci étant dit but really, apart for that sentence or in books, never really use it. Its more on paper

November 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/abuewita

aimer means either love or like. ❤❤❤❤❤❤.

September 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pam520742

I thought ça means that! But Ça meant it. Guessed right but was surprised!

October 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexandraV274306

Cela=it Ça= cela C'est=cela est

November 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jazzysra

It sounded like ils aiment

January 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jazzysra

It sounds like: ils aiment

January 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimmyComri

There was no 2nd "it" to choose

January 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leviwosc

I wrote: "It's coffee, but he loves it" it's incorrect according to Duo. I consider this to be nitpicking at the highest level. In English one can either say that he likes or loves coffee. I find it stupid that my answer is not accepted, it should have been accepted.

February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dana_shahar

How can i say it is coffee and not it is a coffe

February 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexMV14

C'est du café = It's coffee C'est un café = It's a coffee

March 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/glorifai

And C'est café ?

April 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Khaur

"C'est café" is not grammatical. In French, you need an article, either definite, indefinite or partitive, but you can never have a common noun without any article.

May 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DonFeli

What's wrong with "ils aiment ca"f?

September 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Khaur

It's plural form, when the sentence in English is singular form.

September 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DonFeli

I got it in one of those exercises where it just reads a french sentence and you have to write it.

September 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Khaur

Oh I see. Still, there is a slight difference in pronunciation, as there is a mandatory liaison between ils and aiment.

September 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GoShelbyGo

Didn't use a comma. . . aaaand whole thing is marked wrong.

July 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1781

It's not about the comma. Duo essentially ignore punctuation unless it involves a contraction.

October 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeardropExplodes

I thought that c'est was pronounced like "say" in English but here it sounded like "ce" - is c'est pronounced the same as ce?

December 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carlosdelo10

You seem to speak spanish, so going from there:

Ce is with the special french "e" sound.

C'est would be prounced like "se" in this sentence:

Yo se hablar francés.

Va con nuestra entonación de la letra "e".

Cheers!

January 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rainbowserina

Why is 'they like it' not correct? I thought il could mean he or singular they.

February 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/settybooty

There is no singular they in standard English. There is a growing use of "they" as a non-gendered singular pronoun in English, but that isn't useful for a translation from French, because in French pronouns are always gendered. Il=he.

February 18, 2015

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