"Betörted az ajtót!"

Translation:You broke the door!

December 26, 2016

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/KatjaJuliannova
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I think 'broke down' the door would be more common English usage than 'broke in' . Should I suggest that one? Strange that, in North American English at least, we would 'break in' to someplace by breaking 'down' the door.

May 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/dvanclev
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What's the difference between tör and betör?

December 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/96314081311257

"Be" indicates direction here. You were outside, & pushed the door, so it moved inwards.

December 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/dvanclev
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Thanks; I see. So, maybe "break inwards" is a close English translation (and the current suggested translation here doesn't match the Hungarian sentence very closely)? Can betör also mean "break in," e.g. to a house or a bank, or do you only use it to describe the actual action of breaking something?

December 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/96314081311257

Yes, you can also use it figuratively.

December 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/trisec
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The problem is that there's no idiomatic translation of "You broke the door!" that doesn't tell you which direction the door moved. Since it's a complete action, you have to use a verb with a perfective aspect (that is, prefixed), but both "megtör" and "eltör" are used in contexts where it means ~"fracture, rupture, snap".

Now, even if you break a door inwards (or outwards), it tends to stay in one piece, so those prefixes won't work. Your options are either "betör" or "kitör" (if you were inside and broke it outwards).

Note: There aren't a lot of situations in which "törted" would work. You usually don't continuously break something, it's more of a momentaneous action, so it usually takes a prefix to indicate the perfective aspect.

Also, a burglar is a betörő.

December 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/HeruMornie
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Another usage of the same result (the door is off its place, but intact) when letörted az ajtót —imagine when you break off the battery holder lid of a gadget. Letör means that movement. (And also the state of mind when you feel down and out, or desperated.)

October 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Judit294350

Yes, I would assume "you broke the door" would mean you did something so it wouldn't work like the damaged the catch or the hinges fell off. Very different from breaking down (or in) the door

October 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/bnyugat

The better word order in English is: You broke the door in. We wouldn't say: You broke in the door. Unless you were saying the door was new and it kind of stuck in the frame, and you used it over and over until it worked well...like we break in a pair of shoes...

October 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/guntunge
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"eltört" seems to mean "zerbrechen" in German, "letört" "abbrechen" and "betört" "einbrechen". But I don't think one could use that verb with the door as the direct object. Some preposition is needed.
So, I am not sure if I fully understand its Hungarian meaning, but at least the following seems clear:
Betörő - der Einbrecher.
Kitörő - der Ausbrecher.

September 26, 2018
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