"Even though the Smiths are not rich, they are happy."

Translation:Bár Kovácsék nem gazdagok, boldogok.

1 year ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Krisbaudi
Krisbaudi
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Why is the family name translated! Does it mean, that Hungarians and others get English names from Americans? In Germany all foreigners keep their names. My name was never translated from Hungarians into something Hungarian.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jsiehler
jsiehler
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It shouldn't be translated. It's nice to know that kovács means "smith", but as a name, it should not be translated.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey
vvsey
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I have to say it is a "national sport" for Hungarians to translate their own names to foreigners if there is a foreign equivalent. So, a "Kovács János" may introduce himself to you as "John Smith". Or even if they say their own names in Hungarian, they will be quick to try to find something similar that may sound more familiar, or pronouncable, to foreigners.
Or, at the very least, they will say their names in the "wrong order", that is, given name first, family name last, for the sake of understanding by foreigners.
This course itself is just another case of this, with all the Hungarian names that were translated to English and are slowly turned back to Hungarian.
I don't know the exact reason for it, it may be psychological. Or it may just come from the awareness of Hungarians of their language being soooo different from everyone else's, that they are just trying to be helpful. It would be worth a study. Anyway, it is interesting to see the general surprise of the learners of Hungarian here at this phenomenon. I wonder if any other nation does something similar.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Krisbaudi
Krisbaudi
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Maybe it is, because hungarians usually play around with their names and everybody is called with a nickname or something like: Rózsám, csillagom, Tündi, apám, anyám, néni, bácsi, szívem, bogárom, édes kiss valami............. It makes me smile all the time, when i hear it. :-) And i have to laugh loud about the "funny bad words and sentences", which Germans would never take in the mouth, like the sweet ones.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carolgoslen
carolgoslen
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It's interesting to me that you say this. I have noticed the same thing with the use of nicknames. Everyone I've met goes by some sort of nickname with the people closest to them. I recently hosted my Hungarian friends in my home. Since my Hungarian has improved some, this time I understood more of what the mom (who does not speak English) said. I was amazed at all the different names she had for her sons. She always added some ending to their name. Usually calling them "my little" with their name or with son. She also used many other endearments, but you would think she was talking to young boys, not grown young men. I also noticed that they sometimes called her "drága anyam" (my dear mother) . It was a little surprising to me because my own sons would only call me that if they were joking around or being silly, they would not use it in a routine conversation. I wondered if this it true with most Hungarian families or not. All that said, I love the uniqueness of many Hungarian names and that the people have preserved these names. My friend told me that it's important to give a child a name represented on the name day calendar because you wouldn't want a child to not have a name day. I also agree that names should not be translated. I know for instance that the name Hans is considered to be John, but to me if you were named Hans then your name is not John. (My husband's grandfather was named Hans and it is my husband's middle name. We passed it on to our youngest son. )

1 year ago
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