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"Er hört auf, Zeitungen zu lesen."

Translation:He stops reading newspapers.

December 28, 2016

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/borealopithecus

Can this sentence also be Er hört Zeitungen zu lesen auf or is it unnatural or just wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 502

It’s definitely extremely unnatural to put the prefix after the infinitive clause, and I would go so far as to say it’s wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexandrusBabel

How would you say "he stops to read newspapers"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

If he was moving (walking, driving), etc.: Er hält an, um Zeitungen zu lesen.

If he was doing something else and stops doing that: Er hört auf, um Zeitungen zu lesen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexandrusBabel

So that "um" is the difference between "to read" and "reading"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It's the difference between "he stopped the act of reading" and "he stopped in order to read", yes -- um zu is pretty much "in order to".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexandrusBabel

So,

-Er hört auf, Zeitungen zu lesen = he stops reading newspapers. -Er hört auf, um Zeitungen zu lesen = he stops to read newspapers.

Thanks! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rwhitlock

So since "zu" doesn't mean "to" in the sense of "to read newspapers", how should I read the "to"? It's not some separable prefix that goes to some other word, is it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It is kind of the "to" in "to read newspaper", and kind of not.

Zeitungen zu lesen ist sein Hobby = To read newspapers is his hobby.

It sort of turns the verb into a noun. What he is stopping is this action "to read newspapers".

You could also read it as a gerund, since that acts like a noun as well: Reading newspapers is his hobby; he stops reading newspapers.

Sometimes this "verb as noun" uses zu in German and sometimes not -- I'm not sure of the rules surrounding this I'm afraid. But when it's present, it's a bit similar to the "to" which is sometimes used in similar circumstances in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OmerKatz1

Can anyone explain why hört is used here? Isn't it the verb for to hear?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

hören is to hear, but aufhören means to stop.

It is er hört auf here, not just er hört.

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