"Elle veut avoir du savoir."

Translation:She wants to have knowledge.

February 26, 2014

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaTall

is it acceptable to liaise: veuT avoir? Merci

March 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Yes, acceptable and welcome.

March 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sryoo

Why do we use savoir here and not something like connaissance?

February 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Just for the sake of alliteration, I think.

February 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sumemon

Does French use alliteration ?,This seems more like assonance

September 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Oui, you are absolutely right, this is indeed assonance.

About alliteration, do you know this one: "pour qui sont ces serpents qui sifflent sur nos têtes ?"

September 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sumemon

Interesting ,unfortunately I only know examples of alliteration in English ,is your example what'nous autres anglais'would call a tongue twister?

September 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

There is one currently used as an advertising slogan: "je suis passé chez Sosh".

Another one: "Suis-je chez ce cher Serge ?"

Another one: "Je veux et j'exige d'exquises excuses."

A last one: "Un pêcheur a pêché sous un pêcher. Le pêcher empêchait le pêcheur de pêcher !"

February 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Not really, because there is no sound conflict at all here, just the sound S repeated 4 times, and evoking the sound produced by these snakes.

To me, a tongue twister would be: "les chaussettes de l'archi-duchesse sont-elles sèches ou archi-sèches", where 2 sounds are in conflict: SH and S.

September 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/javatete

Sitesurf...ow. That's twisted my tongue in knots. Lol. Might be fun to have a section of tongue twisters!

February 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

Interesting. Is that a well-known tongue-twister in French? It doesn't seem difficult to me, but there's always the chance I'm doing it wrong! Ha.

September 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A_User

My poor tongue! :-D I can almost limp through those at about a mile every five hours. :-D

February 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chirelchirel

Here's a video on the archiduchesse one. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EPFu135MjCA

February 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

They do, but you're right, it is.

September 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Renardo_11

...or rhyme.

July 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

Note that while both "savoir" (noun) and "connaissance" mean "knowledge", "connaissance" has an additional meaning of "acquaintance".

April 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lamarechal

for me it is quite the same, one is not better than the other

March 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiazJulien

Personne ne dirait cette phrase en France

April 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

What would they say instead?

September 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiazJulien

I would say more likely 'elle veut avoir des connaissances'. 'Avoir du savoir' looks really weird to me

September 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

I agree.

September 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

Thank you both.

September 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GlennEstus

I wrote "she wishes to have knowledge" and it was marked incorrect. What's the difference between "wishes" and "wants". None, that I know of in English.

December 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

want = vouloir

wish = souhaiter

December 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GlennEstus

The feeling (meaning) of Wants/Wishes is the same in English. There is no difference. There may be in French, but I try to answer in idiomatic English. One of the problems of a computerized system.

December 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

You are bound to often be in trouble if you translate the French sentences proposed in your best English. In a vast majority of cases, you will be expected to give a grammatically correct and direct translation of the French, because this is a way to memorize the French grammar, construction, vocab...

December 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fleursmortes

Having "know how"is a common expression which I have always equated with" having savoir faire". In fact even the french phrase is used by some english speakers. Duolingo does not agree.-yet. What is your considered opinion Sitesurf? Merci bien.

December 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Know-how = le savoir-faire, as a noun

  • Le chef a prouvé son savoir-faire = the chef proved his know-how

Le savoir / La connaissance / Les connaissances = knowledge

  • Je suis impressionné(e) par son savoir / sa connaissance = I am impressed by his/her knowledge
  • Il a des connaissances approfondies sur ce sujet = he has in-depth knowledge on the matter
December 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steve_V_D

Where does "escient" fit in as a definition of "knowledge"? It seems to me it applies more to awareness / cognizance than actual intellectual knowledge. Can you suggest a sentence where it might be used? E.g. "ils avaient escient de son attitude mauvaise." perhaps? I've seen it in a phrase "a bon escient" to mean "wittingly", e.g. perhaps, "il lui a rendu cette effronterie a bon esceint".?

September 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiazJulien

Escient is only used in the expressions "à bon escient"/"à mauvais escient" that I would translate by wisely/unwisely.

September 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sumemon

Souhaiter does not quite correspond to the way in which '[wish 'is used colloquially in BrE

September 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/javatete

I would politely disagree, only because there is only a mild difference. Wish is used far more often for unattainable things, those beyond the means of the person. Want is used in that way too, but more for things one could conceivably get. Sort of a "do not try, do" semantics.

February 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnimexSIMS

I still don't quite get why the translation to English has "some" in it when there is no "some" in the French sentence.

July 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiazJulien

the english "some" is translated by the french "du"

July 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisJudge1

But "du" is a contraction of "de" and "le". How does one say "She wants to have the knowledge" in French using "savoir"?

July 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiazJulien

Elle veut avoir le savoir

July 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SiobanSnyd

What about "She wants to have some of the knowledge, but not all of it"?

March 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanPratt12

Why not know how?

September 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TechnoBlack

She wants to have knowledge just sounds weird to me

March 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hokrollo

Why not "She wanted to know"?

December 5, 2018
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