https://www.duolingo.com/stripedkitty

Separated Verbs...wait, what?

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I have reached the exercise where the verbs are separated and now am lost (raak...aan ; hebben...nodig). An attempt to translate these sentences would be a guess in the dark at best. I would love to hear how others have learned how to recognize when split verbs are being used along with any other advice/explanation you found helpful. Cheers!

2 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DogePamyuPamyu

I am going to EAT you OUT after we SHOOT UP some heroin. Will you TAKE my dirty, heroin-stained clothes OFF of me first, though? Also, I have a fetish for separable prefix verbs, so I like SHOUTING them all OUT. By the way, would you mind TAKING the cap of this bottle of coke(acola not the drug lol) OFF for me?

Same as in English (kinda), there's just more of them... They almost are always built like preposition+verb, like aanraken aan/raken... meegaan mee/gaan... Except in English they are not written together as one word, and it's more proper to keep both parts together, whereas in Dutch you might end up with the prefix at the end of your sentence.

Nodig hebben is not a separable prefix verb, because it's not one word... It's just a phrase. Same as houden van. You could never say "omdat ik hem vanhou" or "omdat ik het nodigheb" because they don't act like separable prefix verbs. Separable prefix verbs are written together as one verb and are broken apart sometimes depending on grammar. It should explain it in Duolingo I think? If not just Google Dutch separable prefix verbs and you'll find a lot.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stripedkitty
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Thanks for your responses!

Thank you for the hebben...nodig tip - I like that.

I looked up the matter on Dutchgrammar.com. O-o What's nuts is this is my second time on the Dutch tree and though I didn't complete it last time, I don't remember this being so confusing before.

This came from the mentioned site:

"Generally, verbs that begin with 'aan' (on, at), 'achter' (behind), 'door' (on, through), 'voor' (for, before), and 'weer' (re-, again) are separable."

Well. Ok. Think maybe it's time to step away and let my subconscious work it out a bit.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DogePamyuPamyu

Yeah to be honest your subconscious will work it out... It's one of the least complicated things. I remember when initially learning it in German it seemed daunting and just discouraging, but I must have learned it very fast because I have no memory of making a mistake there. I forgot it was a "thing" until your post lol, it's something that you just don't notice over time and you know exactly when and how to break up the word and where to put all the parts. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stripedkitty
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Thanks, at least that is a very encouraging thought :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeviPolasak
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Think of "hebben nodig" as "have needy" I have a shirt needy, meaning I need a shirt. It worked for me. The other ones are very confusing for me too at times. To see if a verb is split, it usually contains "er" or "aan" in the sentence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DogePamyuPamyu

To have something necessary would be a literal translation that could actually work grammatically in versions of English and other Germanic languages.

Also there's sometimes verb that could start with aan- or other prefxies that CANNOT be separated. Aanbidden, aanschouwen, voorspellen, voorkomen, etc... But they're rare.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/I_Am_Robin
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I try to think of two words too, only mine have "have _ requirement" so I have a shirt requirement - need a shirt :)

When it comes to "aan" etc I think you need to memorise what commonly gets separated (like "aan") and when you use it (reflectives lesson mostly)

Each to their own.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/substate
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FYI, it's actually listed as "Nodig hebben" (a grammar book will always list it as such) but this is not a separable verb. And there are many different prefixes that could indicate a separable verb, not just aan, e.g. achter, door, om, onder, over, voor, weer.

2 years ago
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