https://www.duolingo.com/Rae_Carter

Learning Russian: Anyone Have Any Tips?

So I just starting learning Russian today. Any tips about not overwhelming my brain and such? I'm afraid that because I'm not orally practicing what I'm learning that I might forget, or that it might just completely slip my mind. Should I just let my brain take it's course, or struggle to consciously memorize everything I learn? Thank you!

2 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ClarkStephen
ClarkStephenPlus
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If you are a native English speaker, Russian is challenging, but doable. I am an American married to a Russian and I have been studying the language for a while. My strong recommendation is to learn to use the Cyrillic alphabet right from the beginning. This means it will take you longer at the beginning but by the end it's worth it. Otherwise you'll finish the course but still won't be able to read actual Russian. I also agree with what NikkiMorali said: take it slow. Don't be in too much of a rush to get to the end of the course. Redo lessons often and you'll find it gets easier each time.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HandsomeNwealthy

you think it is a lot more challenging than spanish? after about a year and a half i am speaking pretty good spanish

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/relox84
relox84
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Russian grammar is very different from english, even more than spanish, and there are much fewer obvious cognates, so it's definitely harder, but in no way impossible. If you are motivated and take some time every day to study, you could reach a decent level of russian quite fast.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ClarkStephen
ClarkStephenPlus
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How challenging a second language is depends in part on how similar it is to your first language. For a native Ukrainian speaker, Russian is a breeze. The Foreign Service Institute of the US State Department ranks language learning difficulty for native English speakers. They categorize Spanish as a category 1 language, requiring 575-600 class hours of study to reach "professional proficiency". Russian is a category 2 language, requiring 1100 class hours.

Hope this helps.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HandsomeNwealthy

i was really just asking your opinion since it looks like you're learning or learned both

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae_Carter

Okay, thank you. I'll turn on the Cyrillic alphabet right away. Thanks a lot for your suggestions!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NikkiMorali

I would say to just take it slowly. When I finish a lesson, I practice it until I am sure that I have it down so that I can move on to the next lesson without being afraid of forgetting. But of course, everyone has their own learning style so it's up to you. Hope this helps and good luck!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Casper_duo
Casper_duo
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Forgetting is just natural and you shouldn't be afraid of it.
With repeating exposure everything will come together eventually.
This should come naturally.
I don't care if I forget but I try not to.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rappelke

Here's a list of different methods people use to learn vocabulary: http://laschools.net/cms/lib07/NM01000458/Centricity/Domain/625/13waystostudy%20vocab.pdf:

For Russian, where there are a lot more word forms than we're used to in English, I strongly suggest learning "chunks" rather than individual words - the repeating patterns you'll start to notice (pronoun + verb form, preposition + noun, common combinations - every day, this is a ..., on the table). It can make a big difference to your eventual fluency if you only have to bolt together prepared combinations of multiple words. Until you've learned about cases, it's not safe to simply start stringing words together, so memorizing prepared combinations will let you say at least something and get started on pronunciation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissCamden
MissCamden
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are you a monolingual? if this is your first time learning a language it may take some time for your brain to adjust to this strange new activity.

i recommend experimenting in order to find out what works for you.

i am a big fan of letting my brain set the pace, it fits me since i am not in a hurry to complete the tree / learn russian.

attempting to memorize everything would turn my duo study into a chore so i never did.

i enjoy seeing which words my brain takes a liking to & which ones get dismissed as not worth holding on to.

the tinycards duo deck has all the words for the russian course if you need some drilling practice.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae_Carter

Yes, I've taken a year of ASL and a year of Spanish in school, but nothing stuck. Pretty much monolingual. Okay, so just go through the lesson and see what sticks? Thank you!

2 years ago
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