"Latem nosimy jasne ubrania."

Translation:In the summer we wear bright clothes.

January 1, 2017

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/yab401

could one uses "jasne" as "light" ?

January 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

This actually was accepted... until now. While "light" can generally mean the same as "bright", I'm pretty sure (and I had it confirmed by a native) that in this context it would refer to their small weight, to the fact that they are suitable for summer, etc. Not their colour. And "jasne" refers to light and to colour.

So "light clothes" should rather be "lekkie ubrania".

January 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Hereandthere715

I'm also a native speaker, and "light clothes" can 100% be taken either way. I had read this sentence to mean "light" as in "not dark," and I answered it with "We wear light clothes in the summer." ...because "bright" implies not just that something is not dark, but that it is luminous and almost glowing. Whereas, "light" would be like a softer shade of any color--light yellow, light blue, light pink, white, etc. But it was marked wrong. I think you might want to reconsider. But if not, I get what you're trying to do, too.

February 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexanderRevo

"Bright" in English doesn't imply luminosity. Some of the definitions of "bright" as an adjective are "(of colour) vivid and bold" and "Having a vivid colour." (https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/bright).

February 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Hereandthere715

...the most important word of those definitions being "vivid." When I think of "bright" clothes, I do not think of white clothes or of soft purple clothes or light blue clothes or baby pink clothes that are not dark (since they are not vivid, but muted). The only exception being if someone is wearing a PERFECTLY white shirt--then I would call it bright white. "Bright" clothing definitely implies a certain subset of colors which are, in fact, vivid.

February 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/JohannaWeidlich

Maybe we've already dealt with this and I forgot but why is Latem 'in the summer'?

January 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MarcinM85

Well, it's just an adverb meaning "in the summer". It is also instrumental of the noun lato. For the other seasons it works the same: wiosna - wiosną, jesień - jesienią and zima - zimą.

January 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/JohannaWeidlich

Oh, that is quite cool! Thank you!

January 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/LeeJurga

Does "w lata nosimy jasne ubrania" work also?

May 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Maybe it's not 100% wrong, but it feels very strange. Especially that "lata" is ambiguous, it also means "years". Besides, we don't like accepting plural words for singular ones anyway.

May 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98

clear clothes?

June 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Where does "clear" mean "jasne" apart from the idiomatic usage of "jasne" as "clear" = "understood"?

June 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexanderRevo

It shows up in the list of translations if you tap/mouse over the word in this sentence. I also thought it could mean clear as in "see-through" when I saw it there. Kinda misleading in this context.

BTW, apart from the usage in your post, can "jasny" also mean "clear" when talking about the weather? As in "Jasna pogoda?"

December 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JerryMcCarthy99

"Jasna pogoda" (or the reverse) seems to get a lot of hits on The Google, but on closer observation I discover that there is a "Jasna" in Poland, a "Jasná" in Slovakia, and it's a female given name!

February 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/JerryMcCarthy99

Indeed, it would primarily mean "see-through". Not a meaning that would be encouraged, methinks.

February 7, 2019
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