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"In(ne) i"?

Zerr_
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While looking at Swedish content made for native Swedes, I've come across the construction "in(ne) i" a lot, eg., ända in i kaklet.

I'm not sure if this has already been mentioned in a Tips & Notes section or used in sentences and I've simply not noticed, but I can't find anything online about it.

Why is the seemingly redundant i there?

Tack!

1 year ago

1 Comment


https://www.duolingo.com/Joel__W
Joel__W
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The i is indeed not redundant. It functions as a preposition in this sentence. Inne and in on the other hand are adverbs, and modify the verb of the sentece. Inne, like other adverbs of place ending in -e, signifies a place or static location. In signifies motion and direction into something, going from outside to inside something. Some examples:

  • Hon simmade in - She swam into (somewhere). In is an adverb of motion.

  • Hon simmade i bassängen - She swam in the pool. I is a preposition.

  • *Hon simmade i - ungrammatical, lit. She swam in.

  • *Hon simmade in i. - ungrammatical, lit. She swam into.

  • *Hon simmade in kaklet - ungrammatical, since the verb simma is not transitive, and it is also nonsense.

  • Hon simmade in i kaklet - She swam into/up to the tiles (at the edge of the pool) - Here we have both the adverb and the preposition.

  • Hon simmade ända in i kaklet - She swam all the way up to the tiles.

This is meant to illustrate that the adverb is always accompanied by a verb, and the preposition is always accompanied by a noun. To use and expression like in i, there must be both a verb and a noun. If the preposition i is not present, there is no prepositional place, and the noun after the verb is interpreted like an object. In this case, it produces an ungrammatical and nonsensical sentence.

As you might have guessed, the expression comes from competitive swimming, but is now also used in an extended sense to mean "to go hard/give it all until the end".

1 year ago