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https://www.duolingo.com/hamdymoham14

и-ы-е-й-э SEEM ALL THE SAME

HOW CAN I KNOW THE REFERENCE BETWEEN и-ы-е-й-э WHEN I WRITE IN RUSSIAN ? IS THIS COME WITH TIME

1 year ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ZaneReif
ZaneReif
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Yes, as you continue learning the usage of each letter will come more naturally, but for now just practice what sound each letter makes using flash cards or by writing it down.

Just for reference: и = ee in "see" ы = i in "ill" е = ye in "yet" й = y in "toy" э = e in "met"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hamdymoham14

THANKS

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neon_Iceberg
Neon_Iceberg
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э-и-й-е:

Have you seen a way yet?

Хэв ю син э вэЙ ет?

About Ы:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SD-u_lsJ-84

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sB61Fi1LluY

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReturnOfTheDuo
ReturnOfTheDuo
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Have you seen a way yet? Хэв ю син э вэЙ ет? This a good one. I can hear the subtle difference now that they are spelled out like that. Спасибо @Neon_Iceberg

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReturnOfTheDuo
ReturnOfTheDuo
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Привет! Yep they all sound alike at first but you'll get better. Started Russian tree three weeks ago and still having trouble differentiating the pronunciations of some combinations of letters. When I read out loud in Russian I sound like 5 year olds learning their first big words, have to sound out each freakin' letter and repeat, get tongue tied and repeat again. Hence I haven't even gone beyond 3 units on the tree. So it's slow going, especially since coming from the Spanish tree previously where it is so simple and phonetically true almost 100% of the time. Don't even get me started on how to type off a keyboard, took me longer to type that 'Hello!' than punching out the rest of this sentence. Hehehe. Good luck!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hamdymoham14

IM SPEAKING RUSSIAN AS I SPENT THERE 1 YEAR THERE BUT I M NOT GOOD ESPECIALLY IN WRITING AND READING AND THIS WAS 5 YEARS AGO SO H FORGOT SPEAKING TOO .....GOOD LUCK YOU TOO

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReturnOfTheDuo
ReturnOfTheDuo
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Привет! Lucky you, as you already have some exposure to the language it gives you a good start. There's a theory I read somewhere about how previously learned languages become 'fossilised' if you don't practice them often. Meaning that parts of what you've learned are just like a fossil buried in your long term memory and language centre of the brain. However, what you've already gained is never truly gone, it is just waiting to be discovered and freed from you memories when you start using them again.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shady_arc
Shady_arc
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The issue of fossilisation is actually all about a person's "mistakes" solidifying in their brain.

For example, English is not my native language. In a sense, I do not speak English—I speak my model of how English works. When learning a language you inevitably work with incomplete data. You have to make assumptions based on your instruction, your experience, and your native language.

After a while, many learners become so comfortable with their (wrong) assumptions, it becomes very hard for them to improve. They are so used to their own speech they do not even notice native speakers hardly speak like that.

This is called fossilisation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReturnOfTheDuo
ReturnOfTheDuo
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Thanks for clearing that up Shady_arc. I read a book, albeit awhile ago, written by a linguistics professional; I may have confused the concepts in it with other books on memorization theory and language acquisition, as I said it was a while ago. I must have fossilised my interpretation of the concepts then :) Fascinating. It's a wonder that anyone can understand each other if you speak your model of how English works, and I speak my model and the next person has his/her own and so forth; so it's a good thing we have Duolingo to help us learn together. Are you the moderator for the Russian courses? Спасибо for your contribution in creating them.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/viktoriakarlovna

Indeed, И and Е both sound like "ee" (as in the word "meet") when unstressed. If E is stressed it sounds like "yeah" . (Same with the letters O and A- they both sound like "uh" when unstressed.) I've heard that even native Russians have trouble with remembering when to write which, so don't worry- it will stick eventually. Й is a consonant. It equals the English letter y, as in young, yes, yawn. Ы is also an "ee" sound, but it's made in the far back of the mouth, somewhere near the uvula, so it sounds very different- more like an "oo" (at least to my ears). Hope this helps!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hamdymoham14

cbaceba

1 year ago