https://www.duolingo.com/TheQueenZerelda

Does Dutch use the same cursive letters as English?

I would assume so, but it seems wise to ask before I start practicing. Doesn't the roman alphabet only have one set of cursive letters? (Does Dutch use cursive? Ja?)

Bedankt.

2 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Fire-ergens
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Here's a sample of the cursive pretty much everybody learns at school:

I personally don't use it regulary (anymore) as it carries some bad memories. However, I could try to write a sample if you would be interested in such a thing.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sbeecroft
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In general, European cursive doesn't look like American cursive, just as European numbers (handwritten) don't look like American numbers. For example, many Europeans write the digit "1" to look like a "7" (actually more like a Greek capital lambda, "Λ"), and they often cross their "7"s. Similarly, cursive lower-case "n" often looks like a Greek mu "μ", and lower-case "m" like a double-spike mu -- almost as if they're writing the letter upside-down.

It doesn't take long to get used to the peculiarities of European cursive, but if you've never read it before, it can be a challenge at first. Once you're used to it, it's charming and even beautiful. If you're not careful, you may find yourself emulating it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
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Are there really such categories as "European" and "American" cursives, though?

I'm just wondering because in my country (Finland), the schools were told to start teaching a new style a couple of years back. This included leaving out the crossed line of the 7. I'm sure there were many other changes as well and it had all been researched beforehand, and so on, but I think they later changed their minds about the line on the 7, since kids kept getting 1 and 7 confused...

So I would assume the authorities in charge of education make up their own rules in each country or region about what is taught. And once you're out of school you of course write however you like (and hope other people can read it... :-).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sbeecroft
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As far as I know, there is no such thing as "American cursive" and "European cursive". But in reading correspondence from Italian, French, Spanish, and German acquaintances, it looked to me like there was a general difference between the way Europeans write cursive and the way Americans do. I'm no expert, just giving my own experiences.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RJ_G
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I'm not sure if this answers your question because I'm not sure that I understand your question. But, the Dutch use the same letters as the Roman alphabet, however, they might be drawn a little differently in script/cursive. Compare American handwriting of the last 30 years (typically Zaner-Blosser method) vs. handwriting of the 1930s (typically Palmer Method). or European cursive vs. American cursive. Particularly Euro vs. US, some letters are just drawn differently. But, Dutch doesn't have any extra letters, per se, if that's what you mean. Although "IJ" at the start of a word is treated as if it were one letter.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
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Although "IJ" at the start of a word is treated as if it were one letter.

And it's also one letter (occupying one box) in crossword puzzles. :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RJ_G
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Thanks, I didn't know that. Now, maybe someday I'll be good enough to do Dutch crossword puzzles. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/apgdl
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I see "ij" written as a "y" sometimes. Is that grammatically correct?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
Mod
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You mean like this?

That's the normal way to write 'ij'. Depending on the person's handwriting, it's the same as 'y', but without the dots (like how 'g' and '9' look quite the same).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/apgdl
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Yes, but handwriting aside, my question is whether I am allowed to write "Y" instead of "IJ".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
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No, because they're two different letters. ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheQueenZerelda

That answers my question, thank you. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DogePamyuPamyu

Yes for the most part. I love Dutch cursive because of the ji- and -ij combinations. Jij looks like it's written jÿ because cursive -ij looks like a ÿ to me lol.

There's some variation in cursive usually from language to language I've noticed but it's still 100% readable. You might just notice that one letter is written a slightly different way, but it should still look like a letter. It's not like they're using cyrillic to write lol.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheQueenZerelda

Do you know of a site or something I can use to learn those letters?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DogePamyuPamyu

No no, I mean it's exactly the same as cursive in English. If you write Vietnamese words in cursive, a Dutch person will be able to read the writing because they're the same characters. Sure you might write a letter slightly differently, but that's just how it's taught. There's even lots of variation in the cursive of English speakers. You can still read it.

2 years ago
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