https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AubergineViolet

Looking for tips to improve understanding SPOKEN French

Salut! I have been given an opportunity to travel to France with my friends family (all who are fluent in French) this summer. I have been studying french for a couple of years but I still struggle with comprehending spoken french; It is too fast!

Does anyone have any resources or tips that they have found helpful?

Thank you so much!

Em

January 4, 2017

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Posey1235

Instead of " Je ne sais pas", we say "chais pas" for example.
"Je ne trouve pas" = "J'trouve pas" (it sounds "chtrouve pas") and I know some foreigners struggle to hear the ch because it's fast. In my region, we don't say table or cartable (school bag) but we say tab' and cartab' for example. maybe it can help you =) if you have other question, don't hesitate

January 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kurious2no

We Americans do the same thing without thinking about it. Can you translate "Djeet yet?" We slur the words together. The real sentence is "Did you eat yet?" And as DamonandJo on You Tube constantly say..."Say no, no, no to the ne, ne, ne!" And no one says "Nous ____ons" any more! On dit "On." ;)

January 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/varigby

Actually, nearly all native speakers of English do that. But you are right, most learners of English feel native speakers jabber away too quickly!

January 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aman.s

Yes! DamonandJo is an amazing way to learn French, as they make several French videos with perfect accents and they are very funny ;)

August 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AubergineViolet

That is very interesting! I didn't even think about different dialects. What region are you from?

January 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Posey1235

From Bretagne

January 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1231Denys

I find it helpful to pick up guide books in other languages at various tourist sites in the US, and I also found guide books, maps and the like (in French) when traveling in France. For example, I found some in several languages in New York at the Empire State Building, and in Philadelphia at Independence Hall - often free. I have seen them in many languages at tourist sites in America, aimed at international tourists, but useful for practice.

January 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wjbett
  • 1796

Try watching French TV shows or movies (without subtitles). There also is a show called French in Action that you might be able to find on YouTube or Netflix.

January 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AubergineViolet

UPDATE: I have been making an effort to watch French In Action daily ( or every other day) and IT IS GREAT. It already feels like i understand spoken french a little more than i did before. It is filmed in the 80s or early 90s but it holds up! Thanks again for the tip!

January 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AubergineViolet

I found it on Youtube! Thanks!

January 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/drdangoad

What a marvelous opportunity--color me vert! I recently came across (believe it or not!) a web site that provides "News in Slow French!" Oui! You too can go to newsinslowfrench.com and enjoy very articulate French from educated journalists who speak at less-than-lightning speed! I think you will find with direct exposure to the language on a daily basis, that you will pick up more and more of the content and meaning; your ears will learn to adapt. Remember, you can always ask: "Voulez-vous parler plus lentement, s'il vous plaƮt?" No polite person will refuse! Enjoy!

January 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AubergineViolet

I will keep that phrase in my belt! I will listen to News In Slow French in my car when i am driving. I think that will work well! Thank you!

January 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aria487

My main tip is, listen listen listen!
You should enhance listening by reading at the same time. Try gaming or watching something with subtitles(and don't feel overwhelmed, you shouldn't and won't learn all that at once) Audiobooks are also a very good solution but slower than what you're looking for. Speed them up and follow the lines!(Up the tempo, to be precise) Take a look at Librivox for public domain books, it's a pretty amazing project.

January 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AubergineViolet

THANK YOU FOR THE LINK!! I'll take the tip to heart

January 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/varigby

Try to avoid translating word by word. Instead listen to chunks of speech and the meaning of the whole sentence. Concentrate on understanding the meaning rather than translation. Everyone has this problem when they learn a foreign language!

Try some of the videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhWWODVLgKY=PLA5UIoabheFMYWWnGFFxl8_nvVZWZSykc

These are great examples of natural spoken French from around the country with French and English subtitles. On Easy French at Youtube there are lots of topics, so you can scroll through to find something you are interested in.

January 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kurious2no

I just had this epiphany last night. While trying to read a relatively simple book, I was too tired to try quick translation in my head. I "just read" it and let the ideas/meanings sink in. It worked. I have been working too hard at "translating" instead of just capturing the meaning. This is a great suggestion Varigby! Thank you!

January 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AubergineViolet

THOSE VIDEOS ARE GREAT! REAL examples ( Spoken, Written in French AND in English) Thank you so much!

January 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/angthedonut

idk i just started learning and i cant hear a word they say but i can read it and understand it FINE so im just confused.

January 5, 2017
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