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  5. "Pojken äter frukten."

"Pojken äter frukten."

Translation:The boy eats the fruit.

January 4, 2017

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bryce.gleeson

why is it not the boy is eating?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

That's also fine. Swedish doesn't make a difference, so the same phrase translates to both.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MTAliz

Mmm... Frukten


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhoebeGlaz

It sounds like äter has an extra syllable in the beginning when it reads the sentence compared to the word by itself. Is this a TTS issue or is it pronounced differently depending on the word before it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

Sounds perfect to me, actually.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhoebeGlaz

Hmm maybe I've been pronouncing it wrong in general. Is it two syllables starting with the a in "bat" or three syllables where it starts with the e in "hey" then goes to the a in "bat"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devalanteriel

I'm not 100 % sure how you mean, but there are four syllables in pojken äter. I'll list them with English approximations.

  • poj - "poy"
  • ken - "ken"
  • ä - "eh"
  • ter - "ter"

In practice, however, a word that ends in a consonant will often kind of merge with the next word, if that starts with a vowel. So you'll still have four syllables but for a non-native they may be a bit tricky to discern.

It's the same in English as well, but you never think about the process in your own language until you start explaining it to somebody else. :)

Hope that helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brittni813

How do you know when a "the" exists in a swedish word? Is it the ending? This one counts "the fruit" but not "fruit" which of course can in contexts make a huge dofference. How does one know fpr example, whether the swedish is saying "he doesnt like fruit" or "he doesnt like THE fruit"

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