"Der Richter hat keine Beziehung zu seiner Schwester."

Translation:The judge does not have a relationship with his sister.

February 18, 2013

31 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LB_StorM

Is there any particular reason why you don't say '...Beziehung mit seiner Schwester' instead of '...Beziehung zu seiner Schwester'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Menschenkind

Yes and I'm not sure how to reflect that in English, so please tell me if either of them is wrong. I'd have suggested: Beziehung mit seiner Schwester = relationship with his sister (they're lovers), Beziehung zu seiner Schwester = relationship to his sister (they call or see and probably like each other).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LB_StorM

Oh ok, that makes sense. In English the difference is something like this: "[what is his] relationship to Karen" they're siblings (she's his sister). "[How is his] relationship with his sister" (e.g. caring, loving, affectionate, detached). For a romantic relationship with a sibling you usually just include the adjective incestuous "he's in an incestuous relationship with his sister".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Menschenkind

To be more precisely: Beziehung mit always means a love-relationship in German – I can't think of any counter-example. Beziehung zu can mean any kind of relationship, like sister to mother, line x to cube y, company to client, etc.:

How is the relationship with our latest customer developing? - Wie entwickelt sich die Beziehung zu...

How does line x relate to cube y? - Wie verhält sich Linie x zu Würfel y? This might also be translated, less literally, but sometimes clearer in German: In welcher Beziehung steht Linie x zu Würfel y?

People might look at you really puzzled if you said: Die Beziehung mit meinem Hund ist sehr liebevoll.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cephalium

The same statements are indeed valid in both languages. Relationship to.. = Beziehung zu..; Relationship with.. = Beziehung mit.. It's rare for German and English to correspond so closely. The only problem then resides in the meaning of the German sentence. The sister is a relation of of the judge and thus, by definition, has a relationship to him. That is, the sentence is self-contradictory.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilya88

But "his" doesn't have to be "Judge's".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cephalium

Since the nominative (Subject) of the sentence is "der Richter" I believe it does.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilya88

Why cannot "seiner" refer to the previous statement? "Detective, it's time to close the case on Matt Grant. The judge does not have a relationship with his sister."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Libor

Nonsense (the reasoning) better reasoning is:Not his sister, since it lacks eigene- OWN which a German would not have omitted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jmfvillablanca

This sentence sounds like some sort of TV drama


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan_Nicholson

Indeed, my response was "Ah, so there was no incest after all".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AGjr

This is complicated one


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/auntgladys

He would never lie about that, he is a judge after all


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/steziapapa

Why is it seiner


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbie2111

Zu is a two-way preposition and in this example it is used as a dative preposition because it doesn´t involve any kind of movement. Schwester is feminine so the termination for pronoun (sein) is er. 6 six years late, but might help someone else.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kvinfojoj

The only explanation I see is that it's dative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aishae

Der Richter is male judge, right? Is there a female version of this word? Like Schüler, Schülerin etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnirudhKonduru

for most words, adding an -in makes it feminine. This works as a neat thumb rule


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carlina_Marie

Bad recording sounds like Wichter


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Feras..

I think Richter from Richt means "Right" so he is righter because he makes things goes right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/requin230

No, that is wrong. "Richter" comes from "richten - to judge". While it probably has the same root as "Recht - right" it does not imply that the "Richter" rights wrongs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianJosh

This sentence as

mit = incest Zu = siblings

And how would the sentence make sense if they dont have a relationship?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alex_tv80

And do you think this allows her to participate in the same trial?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SydneyBlakem

"The judge has no relationship to his sister" was marked correct. This does not sound right to my (not English) ears. Surely it must be "......with his sister"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/water_color

As it was explained in the comments above, "relationship to" and "relationship with" just mean slightly different things.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sheila351374

Why 'seiner' Schwester!

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