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"Ese día habíamos ido a la iglesia."

Translation:That day we had gone to the church.

5 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/yom_cule

It is the same as 'we had gone to the church that day' and still my translation was marked incorrect!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jwillson
jwillson
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I reported a problem as well. The good news is, they've fixed a number of problems based on my feedback. The more reports, the better Duolingo gets! :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeutschCDMX
DeutschCDMX
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Is this wrong? we had gone that day to the church why?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jwillson
jwillson
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I believe that is correct. Click on report a problem the next time you see it, if you'd like.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/briarose333

is "we had been to the church" not a correct translation? I keep putting "been" for ido, I think it comes out to mean the same thing, is it just more idiomatic and so duolingo doesn't know it, or is there a real reason they aren't the same?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jwillson
jwillson
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I think I see the confusion. The word "ido" would be the past participle of "ir," not that of "ser" (which is "sido," see: http://www.wordreference.com/conj/ESverbs.aspx?v=ser). The form for "ser" would not make sense in this context a couple of reasons. First, in order for the English to be "been" in this context, the Spanish would have to be "estado." Remember, "estar" is used for location status, and "ser" is used for location of origin, as it pertains to identity. Secondly, "a" is used as a preposition denoting movement ("ir a," but not "ser a"). The phrase "ser de" would mean "to be from (identity)," and the phrase "estar en" would mean "to be in/at" (status). Therefore, in order to get "we had been at/in/to the church," we'd need to say "habíamos estado en la iglesia."

Here's an example of both ser and estar in action to further illustrate the difference:

"Cuando había sido un chico, había estado en Nueva York." "When I had been a boy, I had been to New York."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/briarose333

Thanks! So, in english, the phrases "we've already been to the store" and "we've already gone to the store" would be essentially interchangeable in meaning--this isn't the case in spanish though? Or is this maybe like venir vs llegar, where in english they're used almost interchangeably, and they are in spanish as well, but because duolingo wants us to learn the difference between the words it doesn't let us use them interchangeably? I hope this question was understandable...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jwillson
jwillson
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No problem at all! It was definitely an understandable question. :)

The phrases are interchangeable in English, but not in Spanish. The reason: "been to" is a prepositional phrase that makes sense only in English, and does not exist in Spanish. The closest English to Spanish equivalent would be "been in" or "been at," which both get translated to: "estado en." I hope that helps!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KateHenley

On this day we went to church?

1 year ago